Archive for May, 2014

3 Myths About Home Staging

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Posted: 26 May 2014 12:00 AM PDT

By Audra Slinkey, Home Staging Resource

There’s been a lot of talk about staging a home to sell these days because for the first time in a long time, sellers are getting above asking price offers! Making the most money on the sale of the house is the name of the game, and the agents who can do that for a neighbor/friend becomes the agent of choice.

Unfortunately, there are quite a few myths about home staging that need to be corrected…

Myth #1 – Staging is mostly “decluttering.”

FALSE! Staging is about “styling for the photo shoot.”

While removing the extraneous in a home in order to give the seller a view of the architectural details is a part of staging, completely clearing off the kitchen counters, dining tables, and coffee tables is most definitely NOT what a good home stager recommends.Listing photos online often show kitchens, for example, with completely cleared countertops and that are overall lifeless.

But an expert home stager works with the home’s integrity to capitalize and merchandise the space into something that will resonate with the buyer online first — so they’ll then want to see the home in-person.

Myth #2 – Staging is mostly for vacant homes.

FALSE! Staging is more critical in occupied homes because it costs a lot less and has a huge impact.

Consider this photo online originally for this room (another overly “decluttered space”).

Myth #3 – Staging is about neutralizing and painting all the walls beige.

FALSE! Staging is about working with what the seller has, so that the more expensive cosmetic changes don’t need to done.

For example, look at this dark bedroom. It likely would benefit best from paint.

For more information visit
http://styledstagedsold.blogs.realtor.org/2014/05/26/3-myths-about-home-staging/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+StyledStagedSold+%28Styled%2C+Staged+%26+Sold%3A+Entries%29

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(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

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4 PLEX FOR SALE $374,000!!!

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Del_Rio_2

Great investment opportunity or owner occupy 4-plex. Townhouse style units with Two 3 bd/1.5 bath and Two – 2 BR/ 1.5 Bath units. All units currently rented. Tenants pay all utilities. Each unit has a covered,private patio and storage area as well with an attached 1 car garage. Nicely maintained, Good rental history and Cash flow. $2575 Per Month Income

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ARRANGE YOUR PERSONAL TOUR VISIT
http://www.teampendley.com/1666-Del-Rio-Av-SE-Albany-OR~l4638548

OR CONTACT
Team Pendley
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We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!
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Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of
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Checklist: 10 health hazards to avoid when remodeling

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By Kelly Pate Dwyer of SwitchYard Media

Here are 10 hazards to be aware of before you start your remodel.

1. Asbestos

If your home was built before 1980, hire an inspector or environmental consultant to check for asbestos before cutting into or removing potential asbestos-containing structures.

“Always test suspect material,” says Devin Arnett, an environmental consultant in Charlotte, N.C. “It’s cheap, and then you know what you’re dealing with.”

Asbestos can be found in wall, heating and plumbing insulation, siding, roofing, flooring, caulking, window glaze, drywall, joint compound and plaster.

Any project that involves exposure to old insulation or cutting through walls, floors and roofing in homes built before 1980 are most likely to need testing and abatement.

2. Lead

Federal law requires contractors be certified in the safe removal of lead and to test for lead before remodeling homes that were built before 1978. Exposure to lead paint typically starts with scraping and sanding old paint, or when paint chips are ingested.

Arnett recommends remodelers skip stripping and sanding and replace the painted item, such as a window frame. If you own a historic home, hire a lead-certified renovator to complete the stripping safely.

Lead can be anywhere you have old paint, indoors and out. It also can be found in soil, water and pipe soldering.

Sanding and scraping wood trim is one of the main ways lead exposure occurs.

3. Mold

In 2002, Johnny Carson’s sidekick, Ed McMahon, won a $7 million settlement after alleging that toxic mold made him and his wife sick and killed his dog. Most mold situations are less dramatic but can still cause allergic and asthmatic reactions. Unchecked, some mold can cause death.

Mold typically grows on drywall and other organic materials, often in kitchens and bathrooms.

Homes in humid climates are more likely to develop mold, and homeowners often find it when they remove old cabinets and drywall.

4. Volatile organic compounds

Most building materials contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including formaldehyde, which are emitted into the air as fumes. If you whiff a heavy dose of VOCs, they can irritate your eyes or respiratory tract and cause headaches, dizziness, visual disorders and memory impairment.

When possible, choose low- or zero-VOC paints and other finishing materials. Wear a mask and goggles and keep air flowing while working with VOCs inside your home.

VOCs are emitted from a long list of construction and household products, including paint, paint strippers, glues, cleaners, carpeting, flooring, upholstery and cabinet finishes. Nearly every remodeling project is bound to involve some VOCs.

5. Mercury

Mercury was used in heating systems and thermostats in older homes, and it can be found in fluorescent bulbs and thermometers. It can leak when these features are removed. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, when a product containing mercury spills, it can emit an odorless toxic vapor, which even in small amounts can cause learning disabilities and liver damage.

“Mercury vapor is one of the most toxic things on the planet,” says Brent Jorgensen, an environmental consultant in Tualatin, Ore.

6. Radon

Radon is an odorless, invisible radioactive gas that seeps into a home, typically from rock below the foundation. It can flow anywhere in your home. The EPA estimates that radon causes 21,000 U.S. lung-cancer deaths every year.

Inspector Dale Pope of Pope Associates Inc. in Gloucester, Mass., tells clients in his area — which has a high incidence of radon — to add pipe around the foundation of a ground-level or below-ground addition. It can be vented outdoors if high levels of radon are detected.

Projects that add to your home’s footprint need a fresh radon test once work is complete. Homes in the Northeast have some of the strongest radon-gas readings.

7. Underground oil tanks

Before sending digger trucks into your backyard, consider whether an old heating oil tank lies beneath. Heating-oil tanks are typically buried within several feet of the foundation and 7 to 8 feet below ground, Jorgensen says. They often come into play when you’re expanding on your property.

The steel tanks often corrode and leak, causing oil to seep into groundwater or posing a fire hazard, Jorgensen says. Removing the tank may cost thousands of dollars. If it leaks, cleanup costs climb much higher. Inspectors search for tanks with a magnetic scanner or test soil for leaks.

Dangerous leaks are most common in areas that get lots of rain or where groundwater levels are high.

8. Pressure-treated wood

If you have wood garden beds, decks or play sets that were built before 2004, chances are they are made of a pressure-treated wood that contains chromated copper arsenate, or CCA, which contains arsenic and has since been banned.

Arsenic is linked to some cancers, and it can leach into garden soil.

“You get in trouble with the treated wood when you’re working directly with it,” Jorgensen says.

If your remodeling or landscaping project involves cutting or moving pressure-treated wood, wear gloves. Do not grind the wood or burn it.

9. Electrical hazards

Electrical wires run through nearly every wall of your home. They can run along exterior walls and through your yard.

Any remodeling project that involves electrical power poses the risk of shock or fire, particularly those in kitchens and bathrooms that involve additions or changes to wiring, plumbing or both.

Many do-it-yourselfers get shocked or create a fire hazard when doing their own electrical work. Inspector Peter Hopkins of San Diego-based SoCal Infrared, which uses thermal imaging to diagnose energy issues, says that there are unexpected dangers that only a licensed electrician knows to avoid. These include one brand of square outlets that can cause a fire when used with aluminum wiring.

10. Combustion appliances

Combustion appliances — such as furnaces, clothes dryers, space heaters, boilers and gas stoves — warm your home or provide cooking fuel. They use natural gas, petroleum, kerosene, oil, coal or wood.

“Homeowners know not to move these without a professional,” Pope says. “It’s the long-term threats many people don’t understand. Combustion appliances are the air-breathing dragons in your house.”

Projects that involve moving these appliances, disconnecting them from vents, rebuilding vent systems or building walls or doors near or around them require caution and expertise.

Information courtesy of
MSN Real Estate
http://realestate.msn.com/checklist-10-health-hazards-to-avoid-when-remodeling#11

Team Pendley
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We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

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(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of
The Springhill North Albany Car show to benefit CASA of Linn County

http://springhillnorthalbanycarshow.com
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The History of Memorial Day

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General John A. Logan
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division,

The practice of decorating soldiers’ graves with flowers is an ancient custom. Soldiers’ graves were decorated in the U.S. before and during the American Civil War. A claim was made in 1906 that the first Civil War soldier’s grave ever decorated was in Warrenton, Virginia, on June 3, 1861, implying the first Memorial Day occurred there. Though not for Union soldiers, there is authentic documentation that women in Savannah, Georgia, decorated Confederate soldiers’ graves in 1862. In 1863, the cemetery dedication at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, was a ceremony of commemoration at the graves of dead soldiers. Local historians in Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, claim that ladies there decorated soldiers’ graves on July 4, 1864. As a result, Boalsburg promotes itself as the birthplace of Memorial Day.

Following President Abraham Lincoln’s assassination in April 1865, there were a variety of events of commemoration. The sheer number of soldiers of both sides who died in the Civil War, more than 600,000, meant that burial and memorialization took on new cultural significance. Under the leadership of women during the war, an increasingly formal practice of decorating graves had taken shape. In 1865, the federal government began creating national military cemeteries for the Union war dead.

The first widely publicized observance of a Memorial Day-type observance after the Civil War was in Charleston, South Carolina, on May 1, 1865. During the war, Union soldiers who were prisoners of war had been held at the Charleston Race Course; at least 257 Union prisoners died there and were hastily buried in unmarked graves. Together with teachers and missionaries, black residents of Charleston organized a May Day ceremony in 1865, which was covered by the New York Tribune and other national papers. The freedmen cleaned up and landscaped the burial ground, building an enclosure and an arch labeled, “Martyrs of the Race Course.” Nearly ten thousand people, mostly freedmen, gathered on May 1 to commemorate the war dead. Involved were about 3,000 school children newly enrolled in freedmen’s schools, mutual aid societies, Union troops, black ministers, and white northern missionaries. Most brought flowers to lay on the burial field. Today the site is used as Hampton Park. Years later, the celebration would come to be called the “First Decoration Day” in the North.

David W. Blight described the day:

This was the first Memorial Day. African Americans invented Memorial Day in Charleston, South Carolina. What you have there is black Americans recently freed from slavery announcing to the world with their flowers, their feet, and their songs what the war had been about. What they basically were creating was the Independence Day of a Second American Revolution.”

However, Blight stated he “has no evidence” that this event in Charleston inspired the establishment of Memorial Day across the country.

On May 26, 1966, President Johnson signed a presidential proclamation naming Waterloo, New York, as the birthplace of Memorial Day. Earlier, the 89th Congress adopted House Concurrent Resolution 587, which officially recognized that the patriotic tradition of observing Memorial Day began one hundred years prior in Waterloo, New York. According to legend, in the summer of 1865 a local druggist Henry Welles, while talking to friends, suggested that it might be good to remember those soldiers who did not make it home from the Civil War.[citation needed] Not much came of it until he mentioned it to General John B. Murray, a Civil War hero, who gathered support from other surviving veterans.[citation needed] On May 5, 1866, they marched to the three local cemeteries and decorated the graves of fallen soldiers.[citation needed] It is believed that Murray, who knew General Logan, told Logan about the observance and that led to Logan issuing Logan’s Order in 1868 calling for a national observance.

Copying an earlier holiday that had been established in the Southern states, on May 5, 1868, in his capacity as commander-in-chief of the Grand Army of the Republic, the veterans’ organization for Union Civil War veterans, General John A. Logan issued a proclamation calling for “Decoration Day” to be observed annually and nationwide. It was observed for the first time that year on Saturday May 30; the date was chosen because it was not the anniversary of any particular battle. According to the White House, the May 30 date was chosen as the optimal date for flowers to be in bloom.

Memorial events were held in 183 cemeteries in 27 states in 1868, and 336 in 1869.[citation needed] The northern states quickly adopted the holiday. Michigan made “Decoration Day” an official state holiday in 1871 and by 1890, every northern state had followed suit. The ceremonies were sponsored by the Women’s Relief Corps, the women’s auxiliary of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR), which had 100,000 members. By 1870, the remains of nearly 300,000 Union dead had been reinterred in 73 national cemeteries, located near major battlefields and thus mainly in the South. The most famous are Gettysburg National Cemetery in Pennsylvania and Arlington National Cemetery, near Washington, D.C.[citation needed]

Memorial Day speeches became an occasion for veterans, politicians, and ministers to commemorate the War and, at first, to rehash the “atrocities” of the enemy. They mixed religion and celebratory nationalism and provided a means for the people to make sense of their history in terms of sacrifice for a better nation. People of all religious beliefs joined together and the point was often made that the German and Irish soldiers had become true Americans in the “baptism of blood” on the battlefield.[citation needed] By the end of the 1870s, much of the war-time rancor was gone, and the speeches usually praised the brave soldiers, both Blue and Gray.[citation needed] By the 1950s, the theme was American exceptionalism and duty to uphold freedom in the world.[citation needed]

Ironton, Ohio, lays claim to the nation’s oldest continuously running Memorial Day parade. Its first parade was held May 5, 1868, and the town has held it every year since; however, the Memorial Day parade in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, predates Ironton’s by one year.

Evidence exists that shows General Logan had adopted and adapted for the North the annual Confederate Memorial Day custom that had been in practice in the South since 1866. The U.S. National Park Service attributes the beginning to the ladies of Columbus, Georgia. The separate tradition of Memorial Day observance which had emerged earlier in the South was linked to the Lost Cause and served as the prototype for the national day of memory. Historians acknowledge the Ladies Memorial Association played a key role in its development. Various dates ranging from April 25 to mid-June were adopted in different Southern states. Across the South, associations were founded, many by women, to establish and care for permanent cemeteries for the Confederate dead, organize commemorative ceremonies, and sponsor appropriate monuments as a permanent way of remembering the Confederate cause and sacrifice. The most important was the United Daughters of the Confederacy, which grew from 17,000 members in 1900 to nearly 100,000 women by World War I. They were “strikingly successful at raising money to build Confederate monuments, lobbying legislatures and Congress for the reburial of Confederate dead, and working to shape the content of history textbooks.”

On April 25, 1866, women in Columbus, Mississippi laid flowers on the graves of both the Union and Confederate dead in the city’s cemetery. The early Confederate Memorial Day celebrations were simple, somber occasions for veterans and their families to honor the dead and tend to local cemeteries. By 1890, there was a shift from the emphasis on honoring specific soldiers to a public commemoration of the lost Confederate cause. Changes in the ceremony’s hymns and speeches reflect an evolution of the ritual into a symbol of cultural renewal and conservatism in the South. By 1913, Blight argues, the theme of American nationalism shared equal time with the Lost Cause.
At Gettysburg

Soldiers National Monument at the center of Gettysburg National Cemetery.
The ceremonies and Memorial Day address at Gettysburg National Park became nationally well known, starting in 1868. In July 1913, veterans of the United States and Confederate armies gathered in Gettysburg to commemorate the fifty-year anniversary of the Civil War’s bloodiest and most famous battle.

The four-day “Blue-Gray Reunion” featured parades, re-enactments, and speeches from a host of dignitaries, including President Woodrow Wilson, the first Southerner elected to the White House after the War. James Heflin of Alabama gave the main address. Heflin was a noted orator; two of his best-known speeches were an endorsement of the Lincoln Memorial and his call to make Mother’s Day a holiday. His choice as Memorial Day speaker was criticized, as he was opposed for his support of segregation; however, his speech was moderate in tone and stressed national unity and goodwill, gaining him praise from newspapers.

Since the cemetery dedication at Gettysburg occurred on November 19, that day (or the closest weekend) has been designated as their own local memorial day that is referred to as Remembrance Day.

Name and date
“On Decoration Day” Political cartoon c 1900. Caption: “You bet I’m goin’ to be a soldier, too, like my Uncle David, when I grow up.”
The preferred name for the holiday gradually changed from “Decoration Day” to “Memorial Day”, which was first used in 1882. It did not become more common until after World War II, and was not declared the official name by Federal law until 1967. On June 28, 1968, the Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which moved four holidays, including Memorial Day, from their traditional dates to a specified Monday in order to create a convenient three-day weekend. The change moved Memorial Day from its traditional May 30 date to the last Monday in May. The law took effect at the federal level in 1971.[36] After some initial confusion and unwillingness to comply, all 50 states adopted Congress’ change of date within a few years.

Memorial Day endures as a holiday which most businesses observe because it marks the unofficial beginning of summer. The Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) and Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War (SUVCW) advocate returning to the original date, although the significance of the date is tenuous. The VFW stated in a 2002 Memorial Day Address:

Changing the date merely to create three-day weekends has undermined the very meaning of the day. No doubt, this has contributed a lot to the general public’s nonchalant observance of Memorial Day.

Starting in 1987 Hawaii’s Senator Daniel Inouye, a World War II veteran, introduced a measure to return Memorial Day to its traditional date. Inouye continued introducing the resolution until his death in 2012.
Traditional observance

On Memorial Day, the flag of the United States is raised briskly to the top of the staff and then solemnly lowered to the half-staff position, where it remains only until noon. It is then raised to full-staff for the remainder of the day.

Memorial Day observances in small New England towns are often marked by dedications and remarks by veterans, state legislators, and selectmen
The half-staff position remembers the more than one million men and women who gave their lives in service of their country. At noon, their memory is raised by the living, who resolve not to let their sacrifice be in vain, but to rise up in their stead and continue the fight for liberty and justice for all.

The National Memorial Day Concert takes place on the west lawn of the United States Capitol. The concert is broadcast on PBS and NPR. Music is performed, and respect is paid to the men and women who gave their lives for their country.

For many Americans, the central event is attending one of the thousands of parades held on Memorial Day in large and small cities all over the country. Most of these feature marching bands and an overall military theme with the National Guard and other servicemen participating along with veterans and military vehicles from various wars.

One of the longest-standing traditions is the running of the Indianapolis 500, an auto race which has been held in conjunction with Memorial Day since 1911. It runs on the Sunday preceding the Memorial Day holiday. The Coca-Cola 600 stock car race has been held later the same day since 1961. The Memorial Tournament golf event has been held on or close to the Memorial Day weekend since 1976.

Information courtesy of
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memorial_Day

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**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

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1880 N Fern Stayton OR

Welcome Home! This classic Ranch Style home offers more than simply 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2012 sq ft. Featuring Brazilian Koa Floors, Granite Slab kitchen counters, under mount sink, custom kitchen cabinets, double oven, gas stove with griddle, & ss appliances. Open Living room & dining room into the kitchen with breakfast bar. Updated bathroom accommodations & flooring. Newer carpet throughout. Master suite with dual closets. Family room with pellet stove, slider to the back deck and 4th bedroom with walk in closet. Large fenced back yard with established landscaping PLUS 20 x 80 RV Parking Area… all this on a premium 0.23 acre lot!

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ARRANGE YOUR PERSONAL TOUR VISIT
http://www.teampendley.com/1880-N-Fern-Stayton-OR~l4636666

OR CONTACT

Team Pendley
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We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

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Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of
The Springhill North Albany Car show to benefit CASA of Linn County
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Have the Kids Left Home? 16 Things to Consider

Mitchell Parker
Houzz Editorial Staff; writer, musician, father, husband.

1. Don’t panic. The last thing you want to do when you find yourself with an empty house is totally freak out and make knee-jerk decisions. You need to give yourself time to adjust and assess your living situation, to consider what your new lifestyle will be like and for how long.

Just because you’ve found yourself living in a four-bedroom house with just you or you and your spouse or partner doesn’t mean you should immediately sell your home and downsize. Five years down the road, you might have four grandkids and will need somewhere to put everyone come holiday time. And, after all, you’ve been in your house for years, if not decades. You’ve poured money into remodeling. You and your kids have had many of your most memorable family moments there. That’s not easy to give up.

On the other hand, maybe that big house is just too much upkeep. Do you really want to spend all of your newfound free time taking care of that big, empty house? Or maybe you’re looking at retirement, the property taxes are too high, and it makes sense to leave the big city and find a small town where you can stretch your dollars.

So don’t act right away. Weigh all of your options. Can you afford to hire a cleaning service and landscape service to help ease some of the load? Are there any remodeling projects that could help change your living situation? Can you list your property on home-sharing sites like Airbnb to help with additional income?

2. Enjoy the time you and your partner have together — finally. You’ve earned it; now is the time to reconnect with your spouse. Take up old hobbies, go for long walks, volunteer … the sky’s the limit. “We read, watch films, attempt new crafts, do yoga and talk talk talk,” says Houzz user Karen Debenham. “We truly realize how fortunate we are right now.” Her suggestion: “Go on a date once a week and determine not to talk about the children.”

“Empty nesting is a great time to reevaluate your life and be a little selfish with your needs,” says user Cindy Yates. “After all, we raised our children to be independent people. Life is good!”

3. Try renting. Not sure what to do or where to go? Do you move near your kids, into a city? Houzz user Pamela Michael recommends renting first. “Unless you live in an extremely hot real estate market, chances are, you can sell your large family home, bank the money and try living elsewhere for a year or two without investing in buying a house. You will get time to know new neighborhoods, new interests and manage the shift such moves make with all your friends and family. Your investments will likely more than keep pace with the housing market, and you don’t have to sell a home with all its costs should the ‘ideal location’ turn out to be a bust.”

4. Embrace technology. Today it’s easy to stay in touch with loved ones through video chat services and social networks. Embrace these platforms to maintain your relationships with your kids as much as possible. “While my son was based in London for a year, Skype made it feel like he lived a block away,” says Houzz user Bronwyn Rouse.

5. Make healthy meals. With the kids gone and your family down to only one or two people, sometimes it’s easy to forgo cooking a good dinner, causing you to snack or indulge in something quick and unhealthy. Making fresh, healthy meals will keep you in good spirits and keep your energy up.

And this is a good time to try new recipes. Now that you don’t have to please numerous family members and make large portions, you can focus on experimenting.

6. Adopt a pet. If things feel too vacant, and you just have too much love to give, consider if a dog or cat may be right for you.

Just remember that a pet will take away some of your newfound freedom; you won’t be able to breeze out the door to go on a vacation on a moment’s notice. So give yourself some time to think through this big decision and to be certain you want a pet and have the time, energy and resources to take good care of one.

7. Make more friends. Living in an empty house with all that space can get lonely, even if you have a partner. It can be especially daunting if it’s just you. Try to get out there and make friends.

Houzz user Marianne Scoggin joined a local nonprofit singles dance and social club. “I find singles like to eat together, either at potlucks, restaurants, weekly Saturday breakfasts or our local Moose lodge,” she says. “I also belong to a women’s social club.”

8. Throw parties. That’s right. Go wild! Invite as many people you know over for book clubs, cocktail parties, sporting events, backyard barbecues — you name it. Having a full house every now and then will satisfy that need for socializing.

Pamela Cairns knows firsthand. “When my kids moved out, they were fairly young — each at 18 years old. My oldest moved out first, and it was difficult. But when my baby moved out, I was just devastated. Our aunt and uncle like to describe the situation: The first week crying and sobbing. The second week sniffling and small bouts of tears. The third week was a realization that this could be good. And by the fourth week, it was party time.”

9. Get involved in your community. Another way to make friends is by volunteering in your community. Plus, if you’re an empty nester and have pretty much decided to stay put for the remainder of your life, it’s a good idea to get involved in local politics, which will sooner or later affect you and your property.

If you’re part of the baby boomer generation, remember that you are part of an enormous community with big influence and purchasing power. Use that to your advantage and lobby for your future.

10. Ask for help. Having your loved ones grow up and finally leave home can be tough, psychologically and emotionally. You’re going to need to change your relationships, and that can be hard. Of course you’ll miss them like crazy too. (Maybe not.) So be sure to communicate with your spouse or partner and family members and seek out others in your community or friends for help in weathering the storm. Remember that it’s just part of the cycle. Before you know it, your house will likely be packed again with family members and grandkids, and you won’t even remember what it was like when things were so quiet.

11. Tackle that remodeling project. Now that you have a sense of how your new life will go, consider tackling those dream projects you’ve always wanted to. And, if you’re aging in place, think about how your home will help assist you as the years go by. Can you make it more livable for your new lifestyle? Should you remove a second floor and add on to the first? At the very least, this is a good time for a home refresher. Try some new paint schemes or swap out furnishings. With the peanut gallery gone, you can finally make the changes you want.

12. Make your house yours. Whether it’s rearranging things in the house or remodeling it, remember that it’s your house and you’re the one who will be living in it. After years of considering your other family members’ needs, now’s the time to make your home yours.

“A tidy, organized home had been my fantasy whilst the kids were growing up,” says Bronwyn Rouse. “In those precious moments to myself, I would daydream of my dream home where you could open a cupboard without having to slide your hand in first to hold the contents from spilling out. Where you could have a white sofa!”

13. Make sure your kids actually move out. This can be tough, but oftentimes kids move out and still leave behind boxes of their stuff or expect to keep their belongings in their old room. This can sometimes prevent you from truly moving on and focusing on being an empty nester. Let your kids know that you’re repurposing the house to suit your needs, and it’s time to either pick up their stuff or say goodbye to it. That way you can finally turn that unused bedroom into a guest room, craft room, home office, TV room or whatever else you have in mind.

14. Make a dream list. Write down all the things you’ve ever wanted to do should you suddenly be granted free time. Well, now that you have time, start tackling that list. This helps Houzzer pluckygirl when she gets nostalgic for the good old family times. “As much as I cried when the last one left, I’m surprised how much I love the quiet house and the ability to be spontaneous again. I don’t miss the endless laundry piles and dirty bathrooms, but I sometimes miss opening the fridge and not finding the wonderful leftovers from a nice family dinner. When nostalgia hits me and I find myself missing the busy life of raising kids, I get out my list of the things I’ve always wanted to do and start planning. It usually does the trick.”

15. Take a retirement course. No, seriously. These big changes can be challenging both financially and mentally. Take it from Rose Pledger. “Just before I retired, I took a retirement course to help prepare myself for the changes ahead,” she says. “Of everything I learned and made notes about, the thing I remember most is this saying about the three stages of retirement life. In retirement you have the Go, Go, Years; the Go Slow Years; and the No Go Years. Note that there are no ages attached to any one stage, which is the most important point about the three stages.”

16. Discuss living with your kids. This arrangement isn’t for everyone, but as you age, you might need someone to take care of you. It might make sense to sell your home and invest in adding a unit on to one of your children’s existing homes or properties.

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of
The Springhill North Albany Car show to benefit CASA of Linn County

http://springhillnorthalbanycarshow.com

https://www.facebook.com/springhillnorthalbanycarshow

10 tips to ensure your yard sale is worth it

garage-sale-clip-art

By Kathryn Tuggle, MainStreet

1. Have as much stuff to sell as possible

Keep your purpose in mind as you clean out your closets, attics, basements and drawers: You want to clear clutter and make money, says Janelle Gallatin, sale event expert for RummageWisconsin.com, a site devoted to rummage sales, auctions and flea markets in Wisconsin.

“If you need the money, you’ve got to let go of things you like. Look at clothing you haven’t worn in a year or books you never read,” she says. “Let go of any emotional attachment you may have to these items.”

Some of the best sellers typically include children’s clothing, toys, books, antiques, appliances and furniture, Gallatin says.

2. Make sure the price is right

While you want to make sure you turn a profit, your customers are all looking for a deal. People aren’t going to a garage sale to pay retail, Gallatin says.

No matter how hard you worked setting up the perfect yard sale or how much emotional attachment you may have with an item, it’s still only worth what people will pay.

“Just because you saw something listed on eBay for $100 doesn’t mean people will pay that at a garage sale,” she says. “Especially if the item is something you were going to donate anyway, price it to sell — you don’t want to take it back home.”

3. Advertise like crazy

The most common way to advertise these days is online. Most people turn to Craiglist, Facebook and other community message boards, Gallatin says. In all cases, it’s important to have good pictures of what you’re selling so that people are enticed to stop by.

“It’s always a good idea to have pictures of your bigger-ticket items,” she says. “Just make sure that the pictures don’t reflect your clutter-filled garage — they need to look good.”

Other places to advertise include a traditional newspaper, any community newsletters in your area and service stations. The traditional yard sign also works well, Gallatin says — just make sure you take your signs down after the sale to avoid creating “litter on a stick.”

4. Make sure your items are clean and look good

When items have been packed away for several years or stored in a musty basement, they lose a bit of their luster, says Austin Allgaier, founder of garage sale listing website YardSaleSearch.com.

Your items need to be freshly washed and pressed or steamed when possible — nobody wants to buy dirty clothing, he says.

When your items are clean, customers are more likely to linger longer at your sale, says Chris Heiska, founder of YardSaleQueen.com.

“You don’t want to stay and browse if you see things in dirty boxes or things are in disarray,” she says. You can ask a bit more money for things when they are nice and clean.”

For example, a dress might bring $5 if it’s hanging up and is clean and pressed. If it’s dirty and folded in a box, you’ll be lucky to get $1, Heiska says.

5. Organize your items

Organizing before the sale and the day of the sale is critical, Gallatin says.

“You want people to buy your things, and you want people to come back next year. They will remember your sale if things are organized and they can easily look around and shop.”

Think about it this way: Stores are organized, so why wouldn’t your yard sale be?

“If you’re looking for glassware, you don’t want to pick through baby toys to find it,” Heiska says. “Don’t set up a table with jewelry, a coffee maker, earrings and a hammer — shoppers don’t have all morning to sort through your stuff. They will simply go to a different yard sale.”

6. Price your items

“People who go to garage sales hate having to ask how much every item costs,” Allgaier says.

If you don’t have time to price things individually, try to have price “sections” or tables where everything is the same price, he says. One table can be your $1 table, another can be a $2 table.

If you’d prefer, try colored dots or labels, Gallatin says. For example, a red dot can signify 50 cents, while a blue dot can signify $1.

“If you use the color system, make sure you have plenty of signs that tell people what price each color represents,” she says. “And keep things easy with round numbers — 50 cents, $1, $5. You need to be able to add the prices up in your head and quickly give change.”

7. Be prepared to haggle

About 50% of garage sale buyers haggle with the sellers, according to a YardSaleSearch.com survey.

If you are flexible with how much you’ll accept for an item, take baby steps when you adjust your price and try to meet the buyer “in the middle,” Heiska says.

“When someone offers you a price that you don’t like, give them a counteroffer.”

Also, base your price on time of day. If it’s late in the day and you still haven’t sold an item, it’s time to start taking best offers.

8. Hang your nicer adult clothing

Most of the time, shoppers just don’t want to dig through piles of clothing, Gallatin says.

“If you walk into a retail store, do you want to dig through piles of clothing, or do you like to browse what’s on the rack?” she says.

If you have expensive jeans, suits, nice blouses or dresses, hang them up. But other items, such as T-shirts, sweatshirts and baby clothing, can be left on tables or in boxes as long as they are folded neatly.

9. Give visibility to your best items

Many of your customers may be people who are driving or walking past, and you need something that will catch their eye, Allgaier explains.

If you run out of table space, make sure you relegate your cheaper items to boxes and bins. You don’t want a $10 item buried under a pile of $2 items.

Also, make certain you have a variety of things on display.

“You need to catch the eye of whoever is driving the car!” Heiska says.

10. Don’t be afraid to ask a friend for help

Throwing a garage sale can be an exhausting experience.

“A neighbor or friend doing it with you will give you more energy to do everything you have to,” Allgaier says.

Also, if they have stuff to sell while they’re helping you, you’ll have a wider variety of things on display and that will just make your sale more attractive to passers-by.

INFORMATION COURTESY OF
MSN MONEY
http://money.msn.com/personal-finance/10-tips-to-ensure-your-yard-sale-is-worth-it

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of
The Springhill North Albany Car show to benefit CASA of Linn County
http://springhillnorthalbanycarshow.com

https://www.facebook.com/springhillnorthalbanycarshow

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