Archive for February, 2014

Get to Know Oregon Winter Crabing

When you’re lucky enough to go fishing with a good friend who knows the water well, you’re sure to learn something new. That’s especially true when the Columbia River is under your keel to carry you toward new adventure.

Steve Fick first explored the Columbia River estuary as a kid, so he knows his way around the vast waterway where the river meets the sea. We left the snug harbor of Hammond, near Astoria, and slowly motored the short distance downriver to an area just off Clatsop Beach.

Fick had prepared five large crab pots or traps with varied baits – a strategy he often uses so to “see what the crabs prefer.” Sometimes he’ll use turkey legs, chicken wings, shad or salmon carcasses – even a can of tuna for crab bait.

“Oh yes, a can of tuna fish is perfect bait,” exclaimed Fick. “All you do is perforate the can so that the scent comes out – you can also buy canned sardines or mackerel too – both work well. As long as they have a high oil content, it seems to fish well – the scent is what draws the crab into the pot.”

Each Oregon crabber must carry an Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Shellfish License. Each crabber is allowed to use up to three crab pots. We timed our trip to fish our traps during the last hour of the incoming tide and then through the high slack tide period (that’s often the best crabbing time).

Steve said it’s the safest time to crab in the estuary: “There is no reason to be out here on the ebb tide – that’s the outgoing tide and things can go from bad to worse in a heartbeat. It can be the most dangerous part of the tide cycle and this river can change so fast. You just don’t take chances out here.”

Fick said that each trap should “soak” for 15-20 minutes – that allows enough time for the crabs to locate the bait and enter the pot. Each crabber is allowed a dozen male crabs apiece and in Oregon they must be five and three-quarters (5¾) inches across the back. Females are protected to preserve the breeding population of crabs. A crab gauge or other measuring device is essential gear since some crabs miss the mark by only a fraction of an inch.

Steve and I soon had our hands full of fresh crabs, but truth was that the trap made the catching easy – and it turns out, the crab pot is 100% Oregon.

At the Airport Crab Company in Warrenton, they have rolled the steel into rings, welded the weights in place, wrapped the rings in rubber and woven the steel mesh into crab pots since 1948. “Building a crab pot – one that will fish well – is a science,” said company owner Verne Lamping.

His wife, Lisa Lamping, added, “”They really got it right way back then – there are little things you can do but for the most part there isn’t a better way to catch crab.”

Lisa is right. Dungeness crabbing dates to the earliest days of commercial fishing in Oregon’s off shore waters. It was a profitable way to make a living for many commercial fishermen during the slack times between salmon runs. Inside Oregon’s only sport and commercial crab pot manufacturing company, you soon see that the heritage of the business is alive and well.

Gene Elliott, Paul Shaw and Mike Gill collectively own more than a century of experience building pots the old fashioned way – with their hands! They “hand knit” each pot using stainless steel wire to make each pot’s top, bottom and sides. The 18-guage stainless steel wire requires tough, quick hands and a sharp eye to knit the mesh just right. “You have to hold the meshes at exactly the same size,” said Shaw. “So, you really must stay focused on the work all of the time.”

Gene Elliot’s hands worked at a blurry pace – swiftly wrapping the mesh weave, seamless and smooth. “I’ve been at this for more than 37 years – just like these fellas, but I was also a fisherman so I made and repaired my own gill nets. I was already familiar with the knitting techniques before I started working on crab pots.”

Lisa Lamping has long admired the weavers’ efforts – she explained that it’s all “piece work” so each weaver must be accurate and speedy if they wish to make money. “Each of these men is able to consistently weave the mesh accurately; the meshes must be about two inches wide. It’s very ‘old school’ and it hasn’t changed much in a hundred years.”

Down at the dock is where the work pays off. Oregon’s Dungeness crab harvest is the state’s most valuable seafood; last year, the coast-wide catch was worth nearly 50-million dollars.

“It’s an economic component that fills a big void from December to March for many fishermen,” said Fick, who owns Fishhawk Fisheries in Astoria. “Families live here and the infrastructure of support – like the crab pot businesses or the marine supply stores – all of that business stays in our community and it is key to the viability of rural life along the Oregon coast.”

It is also a lot of fun to catch your own crabs and then head to the kitchen where Steve shared a favorite recipe for a stuffed crab sandwich.” “You can do a lot of different things with crab meat,” said Fick. “You can make a chowder, fritters, salads – sandwiches – so many different things. You can mix it with fettuccine, other seafood, so it’s very versatile.”

Fick Crab Sandwich Recipe: Fick mixed one cup of grated swiss cheese with two cups of crab and added one teaspoon each of Worcestershire sauce and lemon pepper before he mixed in on cup of mayo and half a cup of sliced olives. The mixture was then stuffed into each half of a hollowed-out sandwich roll. Steve then spread a generous amount of grated Parmesan cheese across the top of each roll and slid the tray of sandwiches into a 375-degree oven for seven to ten minutes. It was a perfect way to round out our crabbing adventure and bring the day’s activity full circle from the estuary to the dining table.

Interestingly, Fick added that 80% of the crab is caught in the first month of the season – it’s also the time when prices for the seafood are at their lowest. Plus, even if you don’t sport fish for crab, the annual commercial crabbing season provides fresh Oregon Dungeness in your local grocery.

As we enjoyed a very filling seafood dinner, I asked Fick what he liked most about the adventure that’s just off his front door step:
“Oh, it’s simple to do and everyone can be involved in it. It’s easy to catch a dozen crabs per person with lots of action for kids. And – you never really know until you pull the pot up what you got!”

Save the date: Mark your calendar for the Newport Seafood & Wine Festival in February, Astoria Warrenton Crab Seafood & Wine Festival in April and the Charleston Seafood Festival in August.

Get started crabbing:
Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Crabbing and Clamming Information
Crabbing 101
Courtesy of
Travel Oregon
http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/winter-crab/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley Personal Finance Tips
http://teampendley.makingfinancepersonal.com/

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of the Springhill North Albany Car Show to benefit Linn County CASA
http://springhillnorthalbanycarshow.com

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What Every Homeowner Should Know About Plumbing

Home Remodeler Blog

Know the location of the main water shut-off valve; it’s usually by the water meter. Also know where additional shut-off valves are for your water heater, water softener, clothes washer, dishwasher and all kitchen and bathroom sinks. Test those shut-off valves once each year to make sure they operate properly.

If you notice dripping water from any faucet or valve, it may keep your pipes from freezing short-term but have it repaired in the Spring. This not only saves water but also insures the correct operation of your water softener. If you hear a toilet “running” have it repaired or replaced for the same reason.

Purchase plumbing fixtures and faucets from a plumbing contractor who backs up the manufacturer’s warranty and provides his own warranty for workmanship. The average life expectancy for a water heater and water softener is 15 – 20 years The life expectancy for a garbage disposer…

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Springhill North Albany Car Show to Benefit CASA of Linn County Sign Up Time!!!

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SPRINGHILL NORTH ALBANY CAR SHOW TO BENEFIT CASA OF LINN COUNTY
IS NOW ACCPETING APPLICATIONS

Want to show off your cool ride for a great cause?
Join us for fun in the sun
For more information visit
http://springhillnorthalbanycarshow.com

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley Personal Finance Tips
http://teampendley.makingfinancepersonal.com/

trulia tips-4 Ways to Supercharge Your House Hunt

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trulia tips
by Tara-Nicholle Nelson

Every buyer-to-be uses open houses differently. For some, they offer a rich looky-look experience at the very, very beginning of their house hunt. This empowers you to learn exactly what sort of place you can get for the money, at various price points and various spots around town. It also allows brand new buyers to figure out how the photos you see online translate into real world, brick and mortar (and stucco and hardwood) properties.

At the other end of the spectrum, serious buyers often use Open Houses as a convenient opportunity to meet up with their agent and cruise through a large number of interesting homes at one time every week without having to go through the rigmarole of setting appointments with every single seller.

Whether you’ve just decided that buying a home is something you want to do or you are a seasoned, serious buyer waiting for that moment when “the one” hits the market, supercharge your Open House hours. See more properties that are real contenders and minimize time-wasting with these four tactical tricks:

1. Prep yourself. Sure, you can just hop in the car, drive around and look for signs. If your market is very active, you can even find an interesting house or two that way. Or you can maximize your time, conserve your energy and make sure you see as many real contenders as possible in a couple of hours on the weekend by doing a little bit of digital research to create a power-packed Open House viewing session.

New Trulia AppOn the newly beautified Trulia app, you can take a look at any point on the map and see a birds-eye-view of the properties for sale, their list prices and which of them have an upcoming Open House. Tap on any property’s flag to see the property’s photo and a few of the most important details (price, address, bedrooms, and bathrooms), while still seeing the map view. For even more info, tap the image of the home you’re interested in and browse all of its relevant stats, including more pictures. If a home isn’t checking enough of your “must-have” boxes, cross it off your Open House list for the weekend and pat yourself on the back for saving some serious time. If it is, add it to your calendar right from the app.

Tired of driving around different neighborhoods trying to determine if they’re a good fit for your family? Where’s the nearest grocery store? What’s that shady-looking character doing on the street corner? Now you can do it digitally. View the map of your target areas through a number of helpful lenses, like where schools and restaurants are located, or where crime rates are lowest. With these tools at your disposal, you’ll spend less time pounding the pavement so you can have more of your weekend back.

2. Align with your agent to create an Open House viewing list. Via the app, share the properties that you think you’d like to visit on the weekend with your agent. Ask them to do the same, sharing any properties they think you should view at Open House time with you. Then, check in via phone or email to firm up the list so they can plan out an efficient map, do some deep dive research into any property-specific questions you have in advance, and to make sure you don’t have any surprises in the form of places you really wanted to see that don’t make your agent’s list for whatever reason. Do the prep work and get on the same page with your agent in advance. It’ll make your two hours of Open House Hunting as productive as a less well-prepared buyer’s two weeks worth.

One more thing. Making sure your agent knows you are really excited about a particular property at Open House time allows them to touch base with the listing agent and let them know you might have some interest. That way, if they happen to get an offer from another buyer between the time you mention the place to your agent and Open House time, your agent will probably get a call. This prevents you from getting the awful surprise that happens when a great place goes into contract before you can see it.

3. Take notes, and compare them. After every home you see, spend a moment taking down some notes – ideally in writing or on your app – that just help you remember which property features went with which address/price/listing. Once you’ve seen 5 or 10 or 25 homes, they begin to blur, and it often comes up that you’ll want to look back and reference a particular home you visited in a later conversation with your agent or your partner. Having a few notes on your initial impressions, questions, concerns, loves and dislikes about each property prevents you from being frustrated when you later want to have a conversation about it.

Ideally, after each property you see or, at the latest, at the end of your Open House tour on a given day, you’ll also take and compare your notes about the properties you saw that day. I suggest listing out the good (what you liked), the bad (what you disliked), the ugly (any serious deal-killers) and then also the great elements for each property. Think of the great as being akin to clicking the Facebook “Like” button for a property, if that Like button were amped up to “Love.” The Great are those features – or combination of features – so strong that the property is something you’d consider writing an offer on.

The goal here is three-fold:
•to give you the ability to compare properties without relying 100% on memory.
•to allow you to give substantive feedback to your agent that will help them help you prioritize new listings as they come on the market and learn what you are looking for at a nuanced level
•to allow you to compare notes at the end of each Open House Hunting session with your agent or your partner (whoever you’re buying the property with), and to be able to compare pros, cons and takeaways substantively, rather than just saying you liked it or disliked it.

4. Use Open Houses as a screening tool. Here’s the other thing that taking good Open House viewing notes on each property does: it helps you narrow down all the places that looked kind of interesting to a short list for second takes. Good notes, organized by Great, Good, Bad and Ugly can help if you were hypnotized by beautiful staging or turned off unduly by ugly, easily fixable cosmetics. If you love a place, but it still has a lot of bad or ugly line items, or you dislike a place that actually has a lot of “Great” things about it, you can ask your agent to arrange for a private, second viewing before making an offer or totally crossing it off the list.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT
http://tips.truliablog.com/2014/02/4-ways-to-supercharge-your-house-hunt/?ecampaign=cnews&eurl=tips.truliablog.com%2F2014%2F02%2F4-ways-to-supercharge-your-house-hunt%2F

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley Personal Finance Tips
http://teampendley.makingfinancepersonal.com/

Get To Know Oregon Eagle Convocation William Finley National Refuge

Published on Feb 14, 2014

One of the most amazing Oregon wildlife moments is found atop four story-tall cottonwood trees near Tangent where an eagle convocation draws up to 100 eagles in the Linn County tree tops each evening. You can also visit wildlife refuges and see eagles in the Willamette Valley. Molly Monroe, US Fish and Wildlife Biologist at William Finley National Refuge near Corvallis said that there are three wildlife refuges — Finley, Ankeny and Baskett Slough that are easily accessed public settings to see bald eagles and other birds, including thousands of waterfowl.

William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge

is situated along the foothills of the Coast Range at the western edge of the fertile Willamette Valley of northwestern Oregon . A second unit on the east side of the river, Snag Boat Bend, has been added to the Refuge. The Refuge encompasses a diverse assortment of habitats including riparian forest, upland forest, upland prairie, wet prairie, wetlands and farm fields. Elevations range from 185 to 414 feet msl.

As with the other refuges within the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Complex, the primary management goal of William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge is to provide high quality wintering habitat for geese, especially the dusky Canada goose, to ensure healthy, viable goose populations while minimizing goose browse damage to crops on private agricultural lands.

Western meadowlarkOther management goals are to preserve native species and enhance biodiversity. Populations of several endangered and threatened animal and plant species can be found on the refuge. A herd of Roosevelt elk can be found in the bottomland forests or farm fields on the Refuge. Wildlife/wildlands observation, photography, hiking, and environmental education and interpretation are the major public use activities allowed on the Refuge. Limited hunting and fishing opportunities are also provided.

Of special interest are several historic buildings located within the Refuge including the Fiechter House, completed in 1857 and thought to be the oldest house in Benton County.

Habitat improvement and restoration are essential for the continued survival of wildlife populations in the Willamette Valley. If you are interested in restoring your lands to native habitat, such as wetlands, prairies, grasslands or upland oak/savannas, please click on the following link ” Partnership for Fish and Wildlife ” for further information.
WILD GOOSE NATURE STORE LOCATED IN REFUGE COMPLEX HEADQUARTERS FACILITY

Visitors can now look forward to finding friendly faces and information inside the office on the weekends. The Friends of the Willamette Valley NWR Complex, a non-profit organization formed to provide support to the Refuge, opened the Wild Goose Nature Store inside the headquarters office on August 21st. The new Nature Store is open on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from 10am – 4pm. Items relating to the Willamette Valley Refuges, the National Wildlife Refuge System, and other conservation related themes provide the inspiration behind t-shirts, hats, books, pins, and more.

Volunteers are needed! If you are interested in talking with people from all walks of life and sharing your passion for wildlife, contact the Friends at friends.secr.melanie@gmail.com. You may also contact the Refuge Ranger at (541) 757-7236 or Katrina_Maggiulli@fws.gov.
FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT
http://www.fws.gov/willamettevalley/finley/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley Personal Finance Tips

http://teampendley.makingfinancepersonal.com/

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of Linn County CASA
https://www.facebook.com/CasaOfLinnCounty

Keep Mother Nature – and Burst Pipes – at Bay with These Simple Tips

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When you’re a homeowner, the threat of low temperatures, snow and ice come with many concerns, one of the most feared being burst pipes. Not only does a burst pipe result in water spilling into your basement or home, if your house is on the market, the water damage can be detrimental when it comes to selling your home.

Pipes that are exposed to the weather—and unprotected—are vulnerable to bursting in a light freeze because of the wind chill. Luckily, there are some simple steps that a homeowner can take to protect pipes from freezing and bursting when the mercury drops.

One of the simplest solutions for exterior hoses or pipes that are vulnerable to freezing is to allow a small trickle of water to drip out when the temperatures get really cold. Open any faucets in the house for the same effect. Not only will this keep water constantly flowing, it will also keep pipes from freezing. The cost of the small amount of water is nothing compared to the cost associated with repairing a broken pipe.

It’s also a good idea to disconnect any outside hoses from the faucets and turn them off, especially if you’re not going to be using them.

You can even purchase and install foam insulation around your water pipes and tape the joints where two pieces of foam meet to keep your pipes warmer. In addition, you can install electric heating tape or cable around vulnerable, exposed pipes. These items are fairly inexpensive and can be purchased at any hardware store.

If you’re planning on being out of town during a particularly cold time of year, have your neighbors check in on your pipes the same way you would have someone check on your pets. The last thing you want is to come home to a flood in your house because a pipe burst and no one was there to see it. If you must, turn off your water before leaving so you can ensure no leaks will occur.

Understand that these measures aren’t 100 percent effective and every homeowner (including every member of the family) should know the location of their water shut-off switch in case a pipe does burst, as closing it will keep the water from gushing in until you can get it fixed.

Reprinted with permission from RISMedia. ©2014. All rights reserved.

Information courtesy of
The Real Estate Book
http://blog.realestatebook.com/2014/02/12/keep-mother-nature-and-burst-pipes-at-bay-with-these-simple-tips/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!
http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Team Pendley Personal Finance Tips
http://teampendley.makingfinancepersonal.com/

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of Linn County CASA
https://www.facebook.com/CasaOfLinnCounty

Springhill North Albany Car Show to Benefit CASA of Linn County

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This 2nd Annual Event is FREE to the public to attend and will be fun for all to benefit CASA of Linn County! With Cars, Trucks, Food, Music, Vendors, Awards, & Helicopter Rides… This years event is scheduled for Sunday July 13th, 2014 starting at 9:00 am and you will surely NOT want to miss out! Pre Register your “Pre 1979” Vehicle before 7-4-14 for only $15 or $20 with Event T-Shirt OR Day of Show for $20, $25 with Event T-Shirt. Gift Bags & Dash Plaques to the first 100 registered vehicles on the Green the day of the show!

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT
https://www.facebook.com/springhillnorthalbanycarshow

OR CONTACT

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity
Team Pendley Personal Finance Tips
http://teampendley.makingfinancepersonal.com/
Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of Linn County CASA
https://www.facebook.com/CasaOfLinnCounty

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