Archive for September, 2013

Pat Pendley’s Get to Know Oregon Blog Surf Fishing and Clamming

It’s spring on the Oregon Coast and adventure waits at every turn; when the tide goes out the dinner table is set for thousands who gather to dig razor clams at Gearhart Beach in Oregon’s Clatsop County.

Astoria native and longtime clam digger Steve Fick used a short-handled shovel with a long steel blade as he walked the beach and looked for the clam “show” in the surf. “Go down about two inches on the side of the hole and then you pull the shovel toward the hole. Then pull the sand up and as you do that, reach your hand in underneath and feel for the clam’s neck. Pull the clam up but not too hard or you pull the neck off.”

It takes some time and effort to get the feel for this sport, but it’s a satisfying reward on an early morning adventure. “Oh, there’s a lot of enjoyment down here in the morning,” noted Fick. “Digging clams and just walking the beach – plus, you can bring the entire family here too.”

Fick was quick to remind me that each clammer must keep the first 15 razor clams that he or she digs, regardless of clam size. In addition, each clammer – 14 years old and above – must purchase an Oregon Shellfish License. Further, each clam digger must dig their own clams and have their own container.

The best time to go is a couple of hours before the low tide – and the lower the tide the better, so check an Oregon tide table for the best dates and times. If you come, keep this in mind: when the clam tide ebbs and turns to flood there’s another fishing sport that takes over on the beach, and it’s worth checking out too.

Fick was quick to remind me that each clammer must keep the first 15 razor clams that he or she digs, regardless of clam size. In addition, each clammer – 14 years old and above – must purchase an Oregon Shellfish License. Further, each clam digger must dig their own clams and have their own container.

The best time to go is a couple of hours before the low tide – and the lower the tide the better, so check an Oregon tide table for the best dates and times. If you come, keep this in mind: when the clam tide ebbs and turns to flood there’s another fishing sport that takes over on the beach, and it’s worth checking out too.

Brad Fresh is a longtime surf angler and he wears neoprene waders to keep out the bone chilling cold water – plus, he always wears an inflatable life vest too. “It’s not that I’m a bad swimmer, I’m actually pretty good, but if I fill these waders up with water – well, I wouldn’t stand much of a chance. The water is so cold.”

Fresh, his partner Chong Chang and their friend Jim Milanowski are dedicated surf fishermen who like to “prospect” along the beaches. They cast, then move and then cast some more, again and again until they find eager biters among the ever-moving schools of pink fin perch. “Generally, you want to be here closer to high tide,” noted Fresh. “About an hour or two before high tide would be best. But we like to get here at low tide and look for the depressions and coves and other beach irregularities that might be a good place for the perch schools to feed as the tide comes in. Other than that, it’s pretty easy fishing; back to basics really.”

He’s right! Dave Neels at Fisherman’s Marine and Outdoors in Oregon City said it’s a simple fishery to master and it doesn’t cost an arm and a leg to get started. “You don’t have to have a bunch of expensive surf fishing equipment,” said Neels. “You really can catch surf perch on smaller, lighter gear.”

He recommends anglers start with a fishing rod anywhere from 9 to 12 feet long. “That longer rod keeps your line out of the water and you can cast a lot further with a longer rod,” said the longtime surf angler.

He suggested a spin casting reel that can handle 150 yards of 14-20 pound test line. His terminal gear relies on standard “crappie” rigs that have spreaders to keep up to three hooks tangle-free. At the bottom of the rigging is a lead weight – anywhere from 2-4 ounces of lead (pyramid or sand weight styles are best) “gets the job done.”

Neels said that what he loves about surf casting for perch is the solitude of the sport: “You’re standing in the surf on a sunny day and once you find the fish, it’s often a fish every single cast. So, it can be nonstop action and I’ve always got a grin on my face for three hours straight. It’s really a hard fishery to beat.”

Back on Gearhart Beach, Milanowski agreed that he loves the isolation of the surf fishing experience – although he enjoys the company of his friends too. I followed Jim’s lead and used clam necks for bait – although he added that “sand shrimp” are tough to beat too.

I quickly learned that safety is important when facing the power of the ocean – so be sure to consider these measures when you go:
•An Oregon angling license is required.
•Never turn your back to the ocean
•Fish with a partner
•Stand sideways to the waves. You take less punishment from the power of the surf that way.
•Wear a life jacket. I prefer the lightweight inflatable style but I also will wear my USCG approved float coat.
•Fish the incoming tide – you’ll have more success!

Jim said his reward is not only a fun of a uniquely northwest fishing trip, but the chunky surf perch are exciting to catch and delicious to eat. Moreover, the experience provides a uniquely satisfying and somewhat intimate day with the environment of the Oregon Coast.
“There aren’t a lot of people out here,” added Milanowski with a grin. “But that’s what makes it special for us die-hards. There’s plenty of elbow room and it’s easy to get away from the crowds. Now, is the best time of year to go – it is fantastic.”

Surf Perch Cooking
Filet each perch and douse each filet in an egg bath.
Coat each side of the clam in panko and soda cracker meal.
The combination provides a nice coating to both sides of the perch filets.
The preheated and hot frying pan contains a generous amount of vegetable oil.
Cook the perch filets quickly – less than two minutes a side (until golden brown on each side.) Drain each filet on a paper towel.
I enjoy combining the cooked perch with a generous serving of coleslaw

Courtesy of
Travel Oregon
http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/surf-fishing-and-clamming/
Grant McOmie
Grant McOmie
is a Pacific Northwest broadcast journalist, teacher and author who writes and produces stories and special programs about the people, places, outdoor activities and environmental issues of the Pacific Northwest. A fifth generation Oregon native, Grant’s roots run deepest in the central Oregon region near Prineville and Redmond where his family continues to live

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(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

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Do You Know Which Light Bulb to Buy?

buying-light-bulbs-store-selection_36a09b6027539410e0cb36e4ba4f2122_3x2_jpg_300x200_q85
Published: May 06, 2013
By: Karin Beuerlein

Light bulb shopping used to be as simple as turning on a light switch. Today, it means weighing priorities for cost, energy efficiency, and aesthetics. Since you’re probably replacing bulbs one fixture at a time, here are some best-bet picks for each type.

Table and Floor Lamps: Halogen Incandescent
Light shines in all directions, providing a warm glow.
Dimmable.

Looks most similar to the traditional incandescent.

Uses 25%-30% less energy than the incandescent.

Table and floor lamps look best with omnidirectional light. “You probably don’t want a big bright spot in the middle of your lampshade,” says Jeff Harris of the nonprofit think tank Alliance to Save Energy. “You’re looking for a nice, warm glow.”

Halogen incandescents provide that, and are good with dimmers. You may be able to find a dimmable CFL, but it’s common to experience humming or flickering at low light levels.

For non-dimming lamps, CFLs are great if you can find a color temperature you like.
Color temperature is measured on a warmness (candlelight) and coolness (blue sky) scale. LEDs, CFLs, and halogen incandescents all come in a wide range of color temperatures.
Buy covered globes or A-lamps — bulbs shaped like old-fashioned incandescents — rather than spirals if you can see the bulb and aren’t a fan of the spiral look.

Otherwise, just go with halogen incandescents and don’t sweat the fact that CFLs are more energy-efficient than halogens. Your still saving over a traditional incandescent and the glow is pretty.

So why not LEDs? LEDs point light in a single direction, although new LED-containing A-lamps are designed to compensate for that by using prisms or special coatings. But all that extra technology makes them expensive — probably not worth it for your bedside lamp, which isn’t a big energy hog anyway.

Recessed Ceiling Lights (Kitchens, Family Rooms): LEDs

Energy efficiency is key in high-use areas.
80% energy savings over incandescents.
Bulb life (up to 50,000 hours) much longer than CFLs.

Shine light a single direction — rather than glowing.
Brighter than halogens or CFLs.

Overhead recessed lighting in the kitchen or family room gets lots of use, so energy efficiency is a big consideration; plus, you need bulbs that point light in a single direction so the light actually escapes the can or fixture.

LED reflector lamps, the flat-topped bulbs typically used as floodlights or spotlights, are designed to shine light in a single direction. And that means you’ll get a brighter look with less energy output than CFLs or halogens.

New conversion kits let you put LEDs into your old can fixtures designed for screw-in bulbs.

A word of caution: LEDs don’t dim well unless they’re connected to a wall dimming switch specifically designed for them. You can get LED-compatible dimmers at big-box stores starting at around $30. Same goes for CFLs.

If you do decide on CFLs or halogen incandescents for a warmer quality of light:

Buy reflector-lamp style bulbs, not A-lamps or globes, so the light isn’t trapped inside the can.
If you have multiple cans, you can probably get away with a lower-wattage halogen incandescent reflector bulb and save energy while still having plenty of light.

Bathroom Vanity Fixture: Halogen Incandescents
Better for showing color and texture than CFLs or LEDs.

Lighting over the bathroom vanity is a highly personal lighting choice, especially when there are women in the house. If the light isn’t flattering to your skin tone or makes it hard to apply makeup, you’ll be dissatisfied.

That’s why halogen incandescents, with their pleasing light, are a good bet.

However, if the bathroom where you primp is a high-traffic area and you’re concerned about energy use, experiment with CFLs in a warm color temperature and get a separate lighted mirror for your beauty routine.

Stairwell Light: LEDs

Inconvenient fixtures are a good place to use long-lasting LEDs.

How many times are you willing to drag out a ladder and change the bulb in a tough-to-reach fixture? Take advantage of LEDs’ long life by putting them in spots you don’t want to revisit often:
Fixtures hanging in stairwells
Track lighting suspended from a cathedral ceiling
Cabinets
Ledges
Tray ceilings

Recessed areas

Outdoor Floodlight: Halogen Incandescent

For security and efficiency, use fixtures with daylight/occupancy sensors.
Since outdoor lights aren’t used often, not worth investing in LEDs.
CFLs don’t come on easily in cold weather.
CFLs don’t last as long as advertised when turned on and off frequently.

If you don’t want to get new fixtures with sensors, you can buy a sensor attachment that screws into each socket.

Rarely Used Fixtures: Low-Cost Bulbs

Opt for what’s easy on your wallet.
Use the most energy-efficient bulbs, such as LEDs, in most-used fixtures.

If the total yearly hours for the fixtures in your closets, dining room chandeliers, and the naked bulb in your attic are low, go cheap.
COURTESY OF
HOUSLOGIC

Karin Beuerlein
has covered home improvement and green living topics for HGTV.com, FineLiving.com, and FrontDoor.com. She has also written for dozens of national and regional publications in more than a decade of freelancing.

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/lighting/buying-light-bulbs/#ixzz2g6bZ7sKz

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Home Remodeling – Replacement Windows – Part 2

Home Remodeler Blog

Image

Replacing old windows not only dresses up an older home but also contributes to lower heating and cooling costs. If you decide that it’s time to replace your windows here are some things to consider when deciding what to buy:

– Performance – Product performance data is available on all windows giving the R and U values. These numbers tell you the insulating value and air tightness of a window unit.

– Warranties – Look for a window unit that offers the best warranty and an installer who also offers a warranty on workmanship.

– Options – Check out the numerous window options including exterior cladding, colors, insulated glass, Low E with Argon gas, etc. There are many different window styles, as well so that your goal to update old and outdated windows can be achieved and your home can be much more energy efficient.

Check back often for home…

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Pat Pendley’s Get to Know Oregon Salmon Fishing


by Grant McOmie– August 23rd, 2013–

A huge rush of silvery salmon – more than a million fish strong and fresh from the ocean are swimming into the Columbia River this summer. Who wouldn’t like to catch one?

For thousands of lucky anglers – with rods and reels in hand – a huge return of salmon has meant some of finest fishing in years. This week, we head to the broad-shouldered Columbia River with a couple of pros who show us how and where it’s done.

On the Astoria dock at a dark 4:00 am, it was difficult to say “Good Morning” to my fellow anglers who had gathered with their lunches, thermoses, rods and reels in hand to enjoy a day-long fishing adventure. After all, shimmering stars and a sliver of a gleaming moon held tightly onto night. But barking sea lions and an inch of daylight squeezing just above the eastern horizon said otherwise.

If there’s a better way to start a summer’s day, I surely don’t know how it could be much better than an August morning on the Columbia River when Coho and Chinook salmon are on the bite. Fishing guide John Krauthoefer of Firefighter’s Guide Service agreed as he told our small group, “Daylight boys – won’t be long – so let’s button things down, snap up the life jackets and get moving.”

We boarded his 26-foot fishing boat and began to slowly motor across the Columbia, with high hopes for a successful salmon fishing trip. Despite the early call out, we were bolstered by Krauthoefer’s enthusiastic promise of good fishing ahead. “We’re going to start down by the bridge in front of Young’s Bay and try to catch a Chinook or a Coho, so let’s go!”

This river is full of fish. “Oh, it’s a big Coho,” yelled John as Trey Carskadon’s rod doubled down and the line screamed off the reel. “A nice one,” noted Carskadon. “It feels all of ten or twelve pounds. A nice hatchery fish too.”

He could tell it was a hatchery Coho salmon because it was missing its adipose fin, a small half-moon shaped fin that’s located behind the dorsal fin. The adipose fin is clipped off all hatchery salmon babies at the hatchery where each fish is raised.

More than a million salmon are forecast to pass through the estuary over the next few weeks. In fact, the current daily limit is two salmon (one hatchery coho and as of Friday, August 23, one fin-clipped/hatchery Chinook salmon).

It has been “white hot” salmon fishing for the past two weeks, according to the fishing pro who advised that newcomers to the fishery enter the water wearing one critical item: “First thing, you’ve got to wear this life jacket – that’s most important,” he said.

In fact, 14 years and younger are required to wear a US Coast Guard approved life jacket, and there’s more: “If you boat here, you need a fire extinguisher, a sounding device, a marine radio, a G-P-S depth finder and a compass.”

John uses tackle and gear specific to this salmon fishery, starting with the rods he provides for his client’s use: “This is a new St Croix salmon rod that I designed for this fishery – it allows you to use heavier lead (12-16 ounce lead balls) and still retain good action. I also use Shimano reels with line counters and I load each with the newest fiber lines. They are unlike the old monofilament as they don’t have much stretch. The line is a smaller diameter so it fishes better. I use up to 300 yards of it with a backing line under it.”

“There’s another fish,” he yelled as my fishing rod throbbed down and then back up and then down once more. This time it stayed down. I quickly wrestled it from the rod hold and then held on for dear life as the line screamed out of the bait casting reel.

“What have you got there, Mr. McOmie?” asked the grinning Krauthoefer, knowing full well that my fish was a huge Chinook salmon.

The fish ran and I reeled at each break in the heart pounding action. I tried to keep the fish close by the boat, never allowing slack line to develop from the fish’s erratic yet hard charging bursts, first toward and then away from the boat. After fifteen minutes, John dipped the large net under the salmon.

“That is a beautiful fish,” said our guide. “Isn’t that that something special; just look at the way the hits the sides of that salmon.” It was a gorgeous upriver bright Chinook, bound for the Columbia River’s upper stretches hundreds of miles from the estuary.

Carskadon is former chairman of the Oregon State Marine Board and he is a boating safety expert when it comes to the fickle Columbia River. He told me that even in summer, the river conditions often change in a heartbeat. “Right now the river is pleasant – a little breeze and no fog. But that can change quickly. In fact, when the wind comes up and you have a lot of river traffic out here, it can get downright dangerous. People assume it’s like a lake out here but on many days it’s not at all.”

Carskadon said that finding the best places to fish and learning the proper techniques is easier than ever – online. “It’s SteelheadSummer.com, and it is a great tool provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. It’s primarily used for summer steelhead, but the same areas apply to Chinook fishing as well. There are maps available that show you bank access as well as boat access throughout the Columbia River – plus, all of the amenities that you can find up and down the river.”

He added that when it comes to Coho salmon fishing, the best is yet to come. “Don’t miss that September fishery; it’s really something special because the fish are plentiful and you can make it a fun family vacation too.”

He’s right — there’s so much to see and do in the area. Visit the Astoria Column, explore wonderful restaurants, Fort Clatsop National Memorial, Fort Stevens State Park and the Columbia River Maritime Museum. Come out and fish the tide for 4 or 5 hours and you still have plenty of time to enjoy the rest of the day.

Krauthoefer agreed and added, “This is a wonderful fishery close to a great Oregon town that offers plenty to do. Come out, have a good time, wear your life jacket and catch some salmon.”

Find more information on purchasing an Oregon Angling License and locating an Oregon Fishing Guide.

Courtesy of
Travel Oregon
http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/a-silvery-rush-of-salmon/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

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How to Replace Weather Stripping

weather stripping

By: Douglas Trattner

Published: October 26, 2012

When weather stripping on doors and windows gets worn out, cold air comes sneaking in. Here’s how to replace weather stripping and stop air leaks.
Identifying Worn Weather Stripping

Weather stripping deteriorates due to age, friction, and exposure to the elements. It also can be damaged by people, pets, and pests. At least once each year, inspect your windows and doors to check for air leaks that indicate your weather stripping isn’t doing its job.
Self-adhesive foam tape loses its grip over time, causing it to pull away from the door or window frame — or fall off completely. Foam also can lose its resilience, no longer springing up to fill the gap.
Rubber and vinyl weather stripping becomes dry, brittle, and cracked. Over time, it can also lose its shape and effectiveness.
Spring-metal V-shaped weather stripping bends out of shape, cracks in spots, and comes loose thanks to missing nails.

How to Remove Old Weather Stripping

For peel-and-stick-type weather stripping, simply pull the foam strips off the door or window by hand. Stripping that is fastened in place with nails or screws requires a more tedious process of locating and removing all the fasteners.

Options for New Weather Stripping
There’s no shortage of weather stripping options at hardware stores and home improvement centers. As is often the case, the cheaper and easier the product is to install, the less effective and durable it probably is over time.

Adhesive-backed foam tape is inexpensive — costing less than a buck a foot — and peel-and-stick types are easy as pie to install. It works best where the bottom of a window sash closes against a sill, or a door closes against a doorframe. It’s the compression that produces the seal. Don’t expect this product to survive longer than 3 to 5 years.

V-shaped weather stripping, sometimes called tension-seal weather stripping, is the best option for the side channels of a double-hung window or a tight-fitting door. This product springs open to close gaps and plug leaky windows and doors.

Inexpensive peel-and-stick V-shaped vinyl (as little as $0.50 per foot) is easy to install but won’t last much longer than foam tape. More expensive copper or bronze styles cost as much as $2 per foot and must be nailed into place, but they look better and will last decades.

Tubular rubber or vinyl gaskets prove the most effective for sealing large and irregular gaps, such as around an old door. These hollow tubes are large enough to plug big gaps but soft enough to compress nearly flat. Types that are nailed in place last longer than peel-and-stick varieties. Prices range from less than $1 per foot for peel-and-stick to $1.25 per foot for nail-in-place.

Prepare the Surface

Before installing any new weather stripping, start with a smooth, clean, and dry surface. Remove all old adhesive using an adhesive cleaner and perhaps a light sanding. Fill and sand old nail holes. If old screw holes can’t be reused, fill and sand those as well.

Installation Tips

Some peel-and-stick types should only be applied when the temps are at least 50 degrees. Check the product label.
Start with one small area to make sure the door or window opens and closes without difficulty before completing the entire job.
Measure twice before cutting to prevent mistakes and waste.
Cut rubber and vinyl varieties with shears or a utility knife, and metal types with tin snips. Be careful not to bend the thin metal while cutting it.
Make sure to face the opening of V-shaped weather stripping out toward the elements to prevent moisture from getting inside.

Installing Weather Stripping
Adhesive-style weather stripping: Remove the backing and press firmly in place. Removing the backing as you go helps prevent the sticky part of the strip from accidentally adhering to something it shouldn’t.

Nail-in weather stripping: Fasten the strips in place by nailing through the pre-punched holes. For double-hung windows, you’ll need to install the lower half, drop the sash, and then install the upper half.

Courtesy of
National Association of REALTORS

http://members.houselogic.com/articles/how-to-replace-weather-stripping/preview/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

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Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

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Home Remodeling – Replacement Windows – Part 1

Home Remodeler Blog

Image

Replacing old windows not only dresses up an older home but also contributes to lower heating and cooling costs. You should consider replacing your windows if they have:

– Rotting sash or frame usually caused by water damage resulting from neglecting to maintain the interior/exterior finish on the sash.

– Poor weatherstripping around sash. This allows air into the home causing a breeze around your window sash.

-Single strength glass which does not give the best insulating value.

-Seal failure in insulated glass which means the seal between the two panes is broken. This is the case if moisture appears between the two panes of glass.

To be continued …

For more go to http://www.crewcuttv.com/#

 

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Pat Pendley’s Get to Know Oregon Blog Tamástslikt Cultural Institute

by Dave Weich
November 27th, 2012–

On the Umatilla Indian Reservation near Pendleton, Oregon, sits one of the west’s truly remarkable destinations: The Museum at Tamástslikt Cultural Institute.

A world class facility inside and out, Tamástslikt is the only museum on the Oregon Trail that tells the story of western expansionism from a tribal point of view. Permanent exhibits bring to life the traditions of the Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla Tribes, who have called the region home for 10,000 years. But the museum doesn’t merely remember what has been. Tamástslikt (the word means “interpreter”) connects this rich, storied history to our present day — did you know, for example, that the confederated tribes are recognized leaders in the restoration of salmon habitats? — and then expands the experience further by sharing the dreams and concerns of its tribal community in a moving exhibit called “We Will Be.”

Editor’s Note: This is part of an eight-part series of the Oregon Cultural Trust’s Field Guide to Oregon Culture, which spotlights cultural attractions around the state. The Cultural Trust supports more than 1,300 nonprofits statewide in the development of arts, heritage, and humanities programs. Learn how your free contribution can enrich lives at CulturalTrust.org.

About the Author: Dave Weich

Dave Weich is the president of Sheepscot Creative. Since the company’s founding in 2010, he’s delivered the work of more than thirty strategists, developers, designers, and filmmakers to dozens of grateful clients. For fifteen years now, he’s lived within blocks of Hawthorne Boulevard in Southeast Portland. Perhaps you’ve seen him on the corner of 32nd, ordering a Back in Black Bean sandwich from Fried Egg I’m in Love.

Courtesy of
Travel Oregon
http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/oregon-stories/tamastslikt-cultural-institute-a-whole-world-unfolds/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded
!

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Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Check out our Blogs

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