Archive for August, 2013

Mount Angel Oregon Oktoberfest

four_days

main_content

The small community was settled by German pioneers in the 1800s and readily reminds one of the rich Bavarian countryside. Oregon’s oldest and best-loved Oktoberfest began in 1966 as a traditional harvest festival to celebrate the bounty of the earth and the goodness of creation. It is Oregon’s largest folk festival.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT
http://www.oktoberfest.org/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Check out our Blogs

https://teampendley.wordpress.com/

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

@TeamPendleyRE

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Team-Pendley/301683574834#!/

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Depend-on-Doug/349094465108260#!/

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of Linn County CASA

https://www.facebook.com/CasaOfLinnCounty

RE/MAX Housing Blog Pre-Approval 101: What First-Timers Need to Know

Fir_Oaks_1

Sun, August 11, 2013

If you’re thinking about buying your first home (it’s certainly a good time for it!), getting pre-approved for a mortgage should be the first item on your to-do list. So, what does that mean and why do you need it?

Pre-approval means that a mortgage lender has gone over your financials and can state, in writing, how much you’re qualified to borrow. This is crucial information because it helps you define your price range, the amount of the down payment you’ll need in that price range, and even the neighborhoods that are within your financial reach. There’s nothing more heartbreaking for hopeful buyers than realizing the home they’ve set their hearts on is priced too high for their borrowing power.

But these aren’t the only advantages of pre-approval. Having that lender “seal of approval” makes you a more solid candidate in the eyes of sellers. And that can make the difference between moving into and saying goodbye to a home you love.

More buyers today are competing with each other for properties. In many markets, there is a limited supply of homes for sale. The July RE/MAX National Housing Report indicated that across the U.S. there’s about a three-month supply. That means it would take just three months to sell every property that’s currently on the market in the U.S. That’s fairly shocking, considering a “normal” inventory is about six months’ worth. In areas with low inventory, pre-approved buyers already have a leg up on the competition, because they’re that much closer to being able to complete a sale.

In some cases you have to be pre-approved to even be able to put in a bid. That’s typically the case if, for example, you’re considering buying short sales and foreclosures.

So take that important first step toward homeownership by getting pre-approved. Contact a local RE/MAX agent who can help you navigate the whole process.

Pre-approval prep
To get ready for pre-approval, know what’s in your credit reports, pay off as many outstanding debts as possible, and get your financial papers in order. You’ll be asked to provide several types of documents, including:

• Photo ID (usually a driver’s license or passport)
• Social security number
• Recent pay stubs – usually for the previous two months
• W-2 tax forms for the past two years
• Two years of federal tax returns
• Two months of recent bank statements

The lender may also ask for any other investment and savings statements, as well as contact information for your landlord (if you’re renting).

After your paperwork is complete, the lender can often respond in as quickly as 48 hours.

Information originally posted on
RE/MAX Housing blog

http://www.remax.com/c/housing-blog/blog-post/pre-approval-101-what-first-timers-need-to-know

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Check out our Blogs

https://teampendley.wordpress.com/

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

@TeamPendleyRE

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Team-Pendley/301683574834#!/

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Depend-on-Doug/349094465108260#!/

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of Linn County CASA

https://www.facebook.com/CasaOfLinnCounty

DIY Air Conditioner


 

 

DIY Air Conditioner

If you love air conditioning but not scorching electric bills, a homemade air conditioner might be for you.

YouTube vlogger Desertsun02 gets his cool on with a DIY AC that only uses 54 watts of electricity. The system pumps ice water through copper tubing that’s wrapped around the face of fan. So instead of pushing around hot air, the fan generates a cool refreshing breeze.

If you already own a fan and a bucket, this project will cost about $30 and you can put the entire system together in a few hours. Watch how he did it:

 

 

Original Post Courtesy of

Houselogic
Deirdre Sullivan
is an NYC-based writer who’s obsessed with maximizing every inch of her urban dwelling. She’s a former fashionista who has worked for Lucky Magazine, InStyle, and ideeli.com. She recently traded her high heels and Fashion Week pass for a drill and bandsaw.
.

Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/blog/saving-energy/4-fun-and-useful-energy-saving-projects/?cid=eo_em_mkt_solo082013#ixzz2dOT82MKF
 

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Check out our Blogs

https://teampendley.wordpress.com/

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

@TeamPendleyRE

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Team-Pendley/301683574834#!/

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Depend-on-Doug/349094465108260#!/

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of Linn County CASA

https://www.facebook.com/CasaOfLinnCounty

Offered @ $184,900 5 Bedrooms Great West Albany Location

Gale_2

This Single Story Home Located in Desirable SW Albany offers over 2200 sq ft with 5 Bedrooms! With room for everyone, this Larger corner lot with mature landscaping gives you extra room for parking and comfortable living. 5th bedroom has its own private entrance for an independent family member. Many nice updates including laminate flooring, and bathroom remodels. New roof, windows, seamless gutters in 2010. Private back yard w/covered deck, garden area, & additional deck for that larger patio set! This is a must visit home for the price!

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ARRANGE YOUR PERSONAL TOUR VISIT

http://www.teampendley.com/1240-Gale-Street-SW-Albany-OR~l4524293

OR CONTACT

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Check out our Blogs

https://teampendley.wordpress.com/

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

@TeamPendleyRE

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Team-Pendley/301683574834#!/

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Depend-on-Doug/349094465108260#!/

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of Linn County CASA

https://www.facebook.com/CasaOfLinnCounty

9 Tips for Making Your Move Stress-Free

MovingTips
Thu, August 22, 2013

Buying a new home is exciting – and a big deal. If you’re searching for the perfect place, or you’ve already found it and are under contract, the next step in the process can feel more tedious: moving.

Moving can be stressful, a bit expensive and plenty chaotic. But with some planning, help from friends and a little organization, it doesn’t have to be as hectic as you imagine. Here are some tips to take the stress out of your move:

1. Make a plan of attack – Whether you’re moving across town or across the state lines, you’ll probably want to rent a truck. Do you have willing helpers to assist in the move, or will you need to hire some help? If you’re moving farther away, you’ll probably want professional help. Figure out what your moving needs are, and ask friends or your real estate agent for references to a trusted mover. Also, stock up on boxes, packing tape, permanent markers and packing peanuts/bubble wrap.

2. Prioritize your packing – As you start packing your current home up, designate a few boxes for each room that you’ll need quick access to. For example, you’ll want to keep personal toiletries, shower curtains and liners, a first-aid kit and other necessities easily accessible for the bathroom. Label these boxes “Open Now” so you know which boxes are filled with the essentials – and which ones can wait until later.

3. Don’t go it alone – Packing is a monumental task. Invite some friends or relatives over, buy some pizza and make it a packing party! Delegate the tasks you feel most comfortable entrusting others with, like packing up DVDs, books and other non-fragile items. A little help goes a long way to saving you some time – and sanity.

4. Don’t take it all – If you realize you have 10 boxes of clothes and you haven’t worn half of them in a few years, it’s time to part ways. Create three piles: a “keep” pile, a “sell” pile and a “donate” pile. If time permits, hold a moving sale to unload some of the items you don’t want anymore. Bonus: Selling items before you move gives you extra money that you can put toward moving expenses. Added bonus: You reduce the clutter.

5. Forward your mail – Believe it or not, people forget to do this all the time! It’s easy to change your address with the U.S. Postal Service. Simply visit the USPS website, and in a few steps you’re done!

6. Turn off your utilities – Check with your local utility providers, as well as other services (trash pickup, newspaper delivery, cable/Internet, phone), to inform them that you’re moving. They’ll need to know an exact date for your move so they can transition or cut off service. You don’t want to be billed for charges after you move!

7. Change your address everywhere else – Contact your bank, credit card companies, healthcare providers, schools, etc. to give them your new address. Although your mail will be forwarded, you still want to update your contact information as soon as possible to avoid missing important bills or letters.

8. Be flexible – Closing day can be unpredictable, and sometimes there are delays. If you’re scheduling movers or arranging for help, you might want to pick a day or two after closing to avoid a moving-day headache.

9. Consider hiring a professional housecleaner – Sellers don’t necessarily leave their homes in sparkling condition when they leave. If time and budget permit, hire a housecleaner to make your new home move-in ready. It’s one less thing for you to worry about!

Ready to search for a new home? A local RE/MAX agent can help you find your perfect fit.

Courtesy of
RE/MAX Housing Blog

http://www.remax.com/c/housing-blog/blog-post/9-tips-for-making-your-move-stress-free?rmxaid=20156594

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Check out our Blogs

https://teampendley.wordpress.com/

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

@TeamPendleyRE

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Team-Pendley/301683574834#!/

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Depend-on-Doug/349094465108260#!/

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of Linn County CASA

https://www.facebook.com/CasaOfLinnCounty

How to Get Along With the Neighbors — and Live Happier at Home

Everyone wins when neighbors treat one another with kindness, consideration and respect

Seeing people bringing a tall ladder or power tool from a neighbor’s house to theirs is a common sight on my block. In the evenings many of us sit outside on the front porch relaxing, and catch up with others who walk by with their dogs or are just out for an evening stroll. When our chickens escaped into a neighbor’s yard, not only were they not angry, but they helped me round up the hens and toss them back over the fence.

Getting along (or not getting along) with neighbors can make a huge impact on our daily lives and how we feel about our home and neighborhood. Whether you live in the city, the country or somewhere in between, learning the art of being neighborly is something that can benefit us all. Here are eight ways to navigate the etiquette of being a good neighbor. When you’re done reading, go pour yourself something tasty to drink and sit on the porch for a spell.

1. Be friendly. If you are new to the neighborhood, a friendly smile and hello can go a long way toward establishing rapport with neighbors. Introduce yourself when you run into a neighbor you haven’t met yet. And if you’ve been there awhile and someone new has just moved in, a small gift, like home-baked goods (or a treat from a favorite local shop), is a thoughtful way to welcome him or her.

2. Be considerate about noise. As a rule, keep music and loud outdoor conversations down after 9 p.m., and try not to start up the power tools or leaf blower before 8 or 9 a.m.. If you are planning a party, try to let your neighbors know in advance — and if you enjoy throwing frequent parties, it’s not a bad idea to invite your neighbors to one!

If it’s your neighbors who are being too noisy, your first step should be a polite knock on the door. Tell them, without sounding angry, that you understand they are having a great time, have friends visiting etc., but it’s getting too loud for you, and could they please turn the music down or take the party indoors after a time you feel is appropriate? Be sure to thank them when they do what you’ve asked.

3. Deal with problems in person. Just as when your neighbors are being too noisy, any other problem should be addressed promptly and in person. It may seem easier to write a note or dash off an email, but written complaints can seem more mean spirited than you intended, and may shut down communication with that neighbor in the future. Give your neighbor a chance to hear what you have to say in a face-to-face chat, and then listen to his or her side as well.

Remember, your neighbor is likely not going anywhere, so even if you do not particularly like him or her, it is in your interest to find a way to get through it together.

On a related note, don’t gossip about other neighbors! It may feel like bonding to complain about shared problems, but gossiping generally only deteriorates relationships.

4. Be reasonable about pets. This can be a big point of contention among neighbors, so try to tread lightly whether you are the pet owner or the one being bothered by a neighbor’s pets. If something happens once or twice — loud barking, poop on your lawn etc. — take a deep breath (well, maybe step away from the poop first …) and let it go. If there is an ongoing problem, discuss it directly with your neighbor. Even if you are upset, try to think of something kind to say about your neighbor’s pet before launching into the complaint section of your talk.

For pet owners, if a neighbor approaches you with a complaint about your animals, do your best to listen and acknowledge their feelings. Assure them you will do what you can to remedy the situation — scoop the poop, keep your dog on a leash, repair the fence and pay for training if needed.

5. Respect common spaces and shared walls. Keep shared hallways, entrances, and common rooms in your apartment or condo clear of personal belongings. Even though space may be tight inside your unit, it’s important to find another place for that stroller or bicycle — crowded common areas can become a fire hazard, or at least a tripping hazard.

If you share walls (or a floor or ceiling) with neighbors, try to keep noise down to a reasonable level all the time, not just late in the evening. If you live upstairs, consider using area rugs over hard flooring to muffle the noise of footsteps — a common complaint among downstairs neighbors.

6. Keep your front yard tidy. There is no need to get into a competition with neighbors over who has the greenest lawn, but keeping up a basic level of tidiness will be appreciated by all. Put your garbage and recycling cans back promptly after they have been collected, keep grass mowed and weeds pulled, and try to avoid storing too many belongings on your porch or in the driveway.

7. Follow local parking etiquette. Always try to park in front of your own house if possible, and never block neighbors’ driveways. In some neighborhoods with narrow streets, it is the custom for everyone to park on only one side — even if it’s not an official rule, it is best to follow suit.

8. Build community. Building good relationships with neighbors often comes down to the little things. If your garden produces a bumper crop of tomatoes, bring a basket next door to share. Trade tools and skills. Be generous with smiles and be willing to lend a hand if it’s needed. And you don’t need to be part of a neighborhood watch to help keep your neighborhood feeling a bit safer — simply knowing your neighbors and occasionally chatting with them can go a long way. Let your immediate neighbors know if you will be out of town, and whether you will be having anyone stay at your home while you are gone.

If your neighborhood doesn’t already have any events, consider organizing one. Annual events like a block party, an open house or a neighborhood yard sale are a great way to build a sense of community and get to know your neighbors.

Courtesy of
HOUZZ

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Check out our Blogs

https://teampendley.wordpress.com/

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER

@TeamPendleyRE

FIND US ON FACEBOOK

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Team-Pendley/301683574834#!/

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Depend-on-Doug/349094465108260#!/

Team Pendley is a proud sponsor of Linn County CASA

https://www.facebook.com/CasaOfLinnCounty

High-tech sensors make gains at home

bilde

Systems allow loved ones to keep an eye on senior relatives

As more seniors opt for living at home — specialists call it “aging in place” — new high-tech monitoring systems that track every move are becoming more common. These sensors allow seniors to stay under the watchful eye of concerned family members and caregivers.

As the baby boomer population begins to hit retirement, families face the challenge of supporting these seniors, particularly if they live alone.

And as this market grows, more companies are targeting this demographic.
Don Rogers is a part of a trial monitoring program for seniors at The Blakeford at Green Hills independent living facility in Nashville, Tenn.

Sensors track a variety of activities — from noting when his front door opens and closes, to a pressure pad under his mattress that keeps track of the amount of time he spends in bed each day.

Ultimately, the system learns his daily routines and can send alerts to the staff to check on him if he varies too far from his daily norms.

“I think it’s good for them to know if I’m moving or not moving,” said Rogers. “It’s another level of assurance.”

‘Logical’ solution

Traditionally, seniors living alone have had the option of wearing a “panic button” that they could press to call for help.

However, many seniors forget or choose not to wear the button. Experts say some seniors won’t press the button even after a fall for fear of being made to move into a facility. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls are the leading cause of injury and death for adults older than 65.

Care Technology Systems of Nashville uses what its founder calls “fall detection by logic.”

The sensors work together to determine whether an emergency might have occurred. For example, if Rogers gets up in the night, doesn’t return to the bed for more than 15 minutes, the front door doesn’t open or the motion sensors don’t pick up any movement, the system sends an alert to the staff on duty suggesting they check on him.

The company is currently conducting a trial of the system in senior facilities, but its system and others are heading into the home market, as well.

Big market for tech firms

Seniors aging in place provide a sizable market for technology companies, as their children and grandchildren rely heavily on such technology to keep track of their loved ones. Now, checking up on mom or dad could be just a click, text or email away. There is a national surge in monitoring options for seniors, offering everything from GPS trackers for safety on the road to motion sensors monitoring activity at home.

Families can now evaluate grandma’s needs in stages. Nashville-based splitsecnd offers GPS tracking of a family member’s vehicle and access to an emergency call center. Care Technology Systems adds motion-sensor technology to the emergency call button for falls.

Researchers at the University of Missouri aim to go further. Their experiments show that certain automatic monitoring can spot changes — such as restlessness in bed or a drop in daytime activity — that typically occur 10 days to two weeks before a fall or a trip to the doctor or hospital. For instance, a change in gait, such as starting to take shorter or slower steps, can signal increased risk for falls. This could help medical professionals intervene and check out a patient to help prevent a fall before it happens.

Moral conflicts

Protecting grandma may seem fine to some families, but she might not always think so.

“I think there are some moral conflicts that are based on freedom and safety,” said Beverly Patnaik, academic director of the School of TransformAging at Lipscomb University.

Patnaik had a couple of key questions that concern her.

“Does (monitoring) lead to more social isolation?” For instance, if family members get constant alerts about activity, will they be inclined to visit grandma less often?

“Do you want your family and physicians to know if you’re getting more prone to falls?” While the new technologies are designed to keep seniors independent longer, the data the systems amass ultimately may lead families to encourage grandma to go to a facility, Patnaik said.

article first published in
The Poughkeepsie Journal
July 27,2013

http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/viewart/20130728/LIFE10/307280035/High-tech-sensors-make-gains-home

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

%d bloggers like this: