Home for Sale 240 25th Ave SE, Albany, OR

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Spectacular Home built in 1993 offers many delightful surprises. With an open floor plan layout, 3 bd, 1 bth, 1023 sq ft! Many upgrades such as newer flooring, ceiling fans, light fixtures, granite composite kitchen sink & more! Large potted planters w mulch & spring bulbs ready for bloom! 10’x12’ work shop w/ample storage. Covered RV Parking Pad. New Roof & Siding in 2009… it’s a must Visit! 

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ARRANGE YOUR PERSONAL TOUR VISIT http://www.teampendley.com/240-25th-Ave-SE-Albany-OR~l4897728

OR CONTACT  

Team Pendley with RE/MAX Integrity

We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker (541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker Certified Distressed Property Expert (541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker (541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Get to Know Oregon Bend, Oregon Breweries, Part 1

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Brewery & Sports Pub
The perfect place to gather with family and friends, a special occasion or a corporate function, Riverbend Brewing Sports Pub will make the occasion a truly special one for you and your guests. We are  family friendly ’til 11 pm everyday.

Great Happy Hour Monday ~ Friday  4 to 6

All-Star Sports w/16 Big Screens

Every televised sporting event available. Best sports viewing in town!

Box seating for everyone.

Featuring Sunday NFL Ticket, MLB, NHL Center Ice, NBA and MLS Soccer Packages. Blazers, Portland Timbers Soccer, Nascar, all College football games, and much more.

http://riverbendbrewing.com/

 

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Below Grade Brewing: The Story

In 1992 Dean Wise made his first batch of beer. Things went well–at least nothing blew up. . . and the beer was, um, beer–but he wanted something more. Dean went from using a brew kit to creating his own recipes with shocking amounts of the best malts and hops. Some questioned his sanity, but the result was exceptional beer everyone loved. Having dedicated part of his basement to a brewery, when it came time to name his burgeoning business, Below Grade Brewing was a natural fit.

http://www.belowgradebrewing.com/

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Rat Hole Brewing is a start up Nano Brewery in Central Oregon housed in a barn on 10 acres of rural ranch land southeast of Bend. The owners Al & Susan Toepfer, with  many more family members who have spent two years taking a very run down barn that sits atop a 20,000 gallon cistern, into the great little brewery you see and taste today.

http://www.ratholebrewpub.com/

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Bend Brewing Co. is a great place to have lunch, dinner or just some hot nachos and cold handcrafted beer after a day skiing or hiking in Central Oregon’s recreational paradise. 

http://www.bendbrewingco.com/

Information courtesy of

Bend Oregon

http://www.visitbend.com/Bend_Oregon_Activities_Recreation/Restaurants_Food/Brewpubs-Microbreweries/

Team Pendley with RE/MAX Integrity

We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker (541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker Certified Distressed Property Expert (541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker (541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Des Moines – Don’t Miss Today’s Home Remodeler!

Originally posted on Home Remodeler Blog:

Subscribe to the Home Remodeler Blog for home remodeling and maintenance tips.

TV viewers in the Des Moines IA area can watch the latest episode of the critically acclaimed Today’s Home Remodeler TV series this weekend. Here’s the TV Schedule on WOI TV-5 (ABC):

Saturday, February 28 at5:00 pm.

Sunday, March 1 at 9:30 am.

This week on Today’s Home Remodeler we feature the professionals from Standard Water Control Systems. Check out today’s video for a look at this week’s show.

For more videos on home building, remodeling and maintenance, visit our website.

Standard Water Control

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Get To Know Oregon Kilchis Point Reserve

The 200-acre Kilchis Point Reserve is a work in progress. Located in Bay City, it features a host of plants and wildlife forming a variety of ecosystems.

The Tillamook County Pioneer Museum owns and maintains the reserve in public trust, overseeing trail improvements, among other aspects of the land. The Tillamook County Board of Commissioners declared the property a Tillamook County Heritage Area in 2010 owing in part to its significance as the former site of the largest Native American village on the north Oregon coast.

According to Museum staff:

“Tillamook County’s first pioneer settler, Joe Champion arrived at Kilchis Point in 1851 and lived in a spruce stump next to the Native American village while he built a cabin. The Morning Star of Tillamook was built at Kilchis Point making it the first ship built in Tillamook County and the first ship registered in the Oregon Territory. Kilchis Point was also the headquarters of the Whitney Lumber Company from 1919-1927.”

Today there are several miles of trails running through the reserve with plans for more over time. Interpretive signs highlight flora and fauna, Native American heritage and local pioneer settlement. Look for sculptures and other work by local artists along the way as well.

Museum staff note that, “The Ford Family Foundation designed, funded and helped install the Kilchis Point trailhead area complete with benches and a native garden. A paved parking area, bioswale, and an interpretive kiosk have also been completed with funding from the Spirit Mountain Community Fund. Permeable pavers have been used for the parking area and the Trailhead Loop which is approximately one-third of a mile.”

Learn more about Kilchis Point Reserve, and how you can help restore native plants and/or contribute financially here.

The Kilchis Point Trailhead is located on the west side of U.S. Highway 101 at 9000 Spruce Street on the corner of Spruce and Warren streets in Bay City.

Team Pendley with RE/MAX Integrity

We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker (541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker Certified Distressed Property Expert (541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker (541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Get To Know Oregon Willamette Valley Vineyards

Elegant, Classic Oregon Wines…Founder Jim Bernau Clearing LandFounder, Jim Bernau, purchased the Estate site in 1983 and cleared away the old pioneer plum orchard hidden in scotch broom and blackberry vines. He planted Pinot Noir (Pommard and Wadenswil clones), Chardonnay (Dijon and Espiguette) and Pinot Gris.  In the beginning he hand watered the vines with thousands of feet of hose.

Numerous classes at UC Davis, and seminars from here to France, sharpened Jim’s viticultural skills and in 1989 he was ready to build his dream–a world class winery in the Willamette Valley—and make cool-climate varietals, especially Pinot Noir, in sufficient quantities to be served and sold in the best restaurants and bottle shops in the world.

A combination of determination and extraordinary people has brought Willamette Valley Vineyards from an idea to one of the region’s leading wineries, earning the title “One of America’s Great Pinot Noir Producers,” from Wine Enthusiast Magazine.

Our approach is to grow, by hand, the highest quality fruit using careful canopy management, and to achieve wines that are truly expressive of the varietal and the place where they are grown. Since we ferment and barrel each vineyard lot separately (sometimes as small as two barrels) we can save the best barrels for single vineyard bottlings and Signature Cuvée.

Our stylistic emphasis is on pure varietal fruit characters, with attention to depth, richness of mouthfeel, and balance. The wines are truly a collaborative effort of the entire vineyard and winemaking staff.

The winery and underground cellar are carved into the top of an ancient volcanic flow, the soil red from its oxidized iron content and well-drained. This unique terroir is similar to the red clay soil found in the Grand Cru Pinot Noir vineyards of Romaneé-st-Vivant in Burgundy, where the “soil gives France’s most perfumed, satiny, expensive wine” (Hugh Johnson, World Atlas of Wine).

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT

http://wvv.com//index.cfm

Team Pendley with RE/MAX Integrity

We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker (541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker Certified Distressed Property Expert (541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker (541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

 

Save Money With Geothermal Heating & Cooling

Originally posted on Home Remodeler Blog:

Subscribe to the Home Remodeler Blog for home remodeling and maintenance tips.

Save Money With Geothermal Heating & Cooling episode from the Today’s Home Remodeler TV series. We’ve all heard about geothermal – the promise of increased comfort and savings by replacing your old furnace with a geothermal system. In this video, host Stuart Keith and Stan Olson from Olson Heating, Cooling & Geothermaltalk about the components that make up a geothermal heating and cooling system and the increased efficiency and savings that a geothermal system brings over old fashioned propane or oil furnaces.

For more videos on home building, remodeling and maintenance, visit our website.

Stan

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Don’t Miss These Home Tax Deductions

 

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Mortgage Interest Deduction

One of the neatest deductions itemizing homeowners can take advantage of is the mortgage interest deduction, which you claim on Schedule A. To get the mortgage interest deduction, your mortgage must be secured by your home — and your home can be a house, trailer, or boat, as long as you can sleep in it, cook in it, and it has a toilet.

Interest you pay on a mortgage of up to $1 million — or $500,000 if you’re married filing separately — is deductible when you use the loan to buy, build, or improve your home.

If you take on another mortgage (including a second mortgage, home equity loan, or home equity line of credit) to improve your home or to buy or build a second home, that counts towards the $1 million limit.

If you use loans secured by your home for other things — like sending your kid to college — you can still deduct the interest on loans up $100,000 ($50,000 for married filing separately) because your home secures the loan.

PMI and FHA Mortgage Insurance Premiums

You can deduct the cost of private mortgage insurance (PMI) as mortgage interest on Schedule A if you itemize your return. The change only applies to loans taken out in 2007 or later.

By the way, the 2014 tax season is the last for which you can claim this deduction unless Congress renews it for 2015, which may happen, but is uncertain.

What’s PMI? If you have a mortgage but didn’t put down a fairly good-sized downpayment (usually 20%), the lender requires the mortgage be insured. The premium on that insurance can be deducted, so long as your income is less than $100,000 (or $50,000 for married filing separately).

If your adjusted gross income is more than $100,000, your deduction is reduced by 10% for each $1,000 ($500 in the case of a married individual filing a separate return) that your adjusted gross income exceeds $100,000 ($50,000 in the case of a married individual filing a separate return). So, if you make $110,000 or more, you can’t claim the deduction (10% x 10 = 100%).

Besides private mortgage insurance, there’s government insurance from FHA, VA, and the Rural Housing Service. Some of those premiums are paid at closing, and deducting them is complicated. A tax adviser or tax software program can help you calculate this deduction. Also, the rules vary between the agencies.

Prepaid Interest Deduction

Prepaid interest (or points) you paid when you took out your mortgage is generally 100% deductible in the year you paid it along with other mortgage interest.

If you refinance your mortgage and use that money for home improvements, any points you pay are also deductible in the same year.

But if you refinance to get a better rate or shorten the length of your mortgage, or to use the money for something other than home improvements, such as college tuition, you’ll need to deduct the points over the life of your mortgage. Say you refi into a 10-year mortgage and pay $3,000 in points. You can deduct $300 per year for 10 years.

So what happens if you refi again down the road?

Example: Three years after your first refi, you refinance again. Using the $3,000 in points scenario above, you’ll have deducted $900 ($300 x 3 years) so far. That leaves $2,400, which you can deduct in full the year you complete your second refi. If you paid points for the new loan, the process starts again; you can deduct the points over the life of the loan.

Home mortgage interest and points are reported on Schedule A of IRS Form 1040.

Your lender will send you a Form 1098 that lists the points you paid. If not, you should be able to find the amount listed on the HUD-1 settlement sheet you got when you closed the purchase of your home or your refinance closing.

Property Tax Deduction

You can deduct on Schedule A the real estate property taxes you pay. If you have a mortgage with an escrow account, the amount of real estate property taxes you paid shows up on your annual escrow statement.

If you bought a house this year, check your HUD-1 settlement statement to see if you paid any property taxes when you closed the purchase of your house. Those taxes are deductible on Schedule A, too.

Energy-Efficiency Upgrades

If you made your home more energy efficient in 2014, you might qualify for the residential energy tax credit.

Tax credits are especially valuable because they let you offset what you owe the IRS dollar for dollar for up to 10% of the amount you spent on certain home energy-efficiency upgrades.

The credit carries a lifetime cap of $500 (less for some products), so if you’ve used it in years past, you’ll have to subtract prior tax credits from that $500 limit. Lucky for you, there’s no cap on how much you’ll save on utility bills thanks to your energy-efficiency upgrades.

Among the upgrades that might qualify for the credit:

  • Biomass stoves
  • Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning
  • Insulation
  • Roofs (metal and asphalt)
  • Water heaters (non-solar)
  • Windows, doors, and skylights

To claim the credit, file IRS Form 5695 with your return.

Vacation Home Tax Deductions

The rules on tax deductions for vacation homes are complicated. Do yourself a favor and keep good records about how and when you use your vacation home.

  • If you’re the only one using your vacation home (you don’t rent it out for more than 14 days a year), you deduct mortgage interest and real estate taxes on Schedule A.
  • Rent your vacation home out for more than 14 days and use it yourself fewer than 15 days (or 10% of total rental days, whichever is greater), and it’s treated like a rental property. Your expenses are deducted on Schedule E.
  • Rent your home for part of the year and use it yourself for more than the greater of 14 days or 10% of the days you rent it and you have to keep track of income, expenses, and allocate them based on how often you used and how often you rented the house.

Homebuyer Tax Credit

This isn’t a deduction, but it’s important to keep track of if you claimed it in 2008.

There were federal first-time homebuyer tax credits in 2008, 2009, and 2010.

If you claimed the homebuyer tax credit for a purchase made after April 8, 2008, and before Jan. 1, 2009, you must repay 1/15th of the credit over 15 years, with no interest.

The IRS has a tool you can use to help figure out what you owe each year until it’s paid off. Or if the home stops being your main home, you may need to add the remaining unpaid credit amount to your income tax on your next tax return.

Generally, you don’t have to pay back the credit if you bought your home in 2009, 2010, or early 2011. The exception: You have to repay the full credit amount if you sold your house or stopped using it as primary residence within 36 months of the purchase date. Then you must repay it with your tax return for the year the home stopped being your principal residence.

The repayment rules are less rigorous for uniformed service members, Foreign Service workers, and intelligence community workers who got sent on extended duty at least 50 miles from their principal residence.

Related: A Homeowner’s Guide to Taxes

This article provides general information about tax laws and consequences, but shouldn’t be relied upon as tax or legal advice applicable to particular transactions or circumstances. Consult a tax professional for such advice; tax laws may vary by jurisdiction.

By: Dona DeZube

Published: December 22, 2014

Read more: http://members.houselogic.com/articles/home-tax-deductions/preview/?cid=eo_rl_sss_rcrpromo#ixzz3RpLNCE3K

 

Team Pendley with RE/MAX Integrity

We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker (541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker Certified Distressed Property Expert (541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker (541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

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