3849 Ryunkin St SE, Albany, OR Great Commuter Location!

Amazing Hickory Floors & Cabinets as well as the large open windows with 12’ ceilings brighten up every space of this home! Master suite on the main level including dual sinks & walk in closet. Open living room floor plan & gas fireplace, large dining area, tiled kitchen counters & island with breakfast bar with SS appliances! Oversized upstairs bedrooms with full Jack n’ Jill bathroom. Fully landscaped front & back yard with UGS.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ARRANGE YOUR PERSONAL TOUR VISIT

http://www.teampendley.com/3849-Ryunkin-St-SE-Albany-OR~l4833099

OR CONTACT
Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Doug Hall w/ Team Pendley Your Local Veteran-Certified Agent

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Your Albany, Oregon and Portland Air National Guard Base at Portland International Airport area Veteran-Certified agent Doug Hall is dedicated to helping reduce the cost of our Veterans buying or selling their home. Doug is a real estate professional who has joined our Membership Benefits Program and received the additional certifications to represent Veterans in the sale or purchase of their next home. Doug Hall is a top-producing agent in the Albany, Oregon market and knows real estate, VA Loans and is a dedicated supporting our military.

Doug Hall’s track record of success, professional training, and dedication to Military/Veterans is unmatched in the Albany, Oregon market. Contact Doug Hall today to learn more about this National Program and receive a Free Membership to the Veterans First Membership Benefits Program and begin enjoying the many benefits of this program.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT

http://www.veteransfirstagents.com/Oregon/Albany/Doug-Hall.htm

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

How to Protect Your Home From Severe Cold

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By: Gwen Moran


Understand the Threats

Blizzards: Storms with heavy winds and large amounts of snow accumulation can cause roof or other structural damage and leave you isolated.

Ice storms and ice dams: Ice storms coat structures, trees, power lines, cars, roads—and virtually everything else—with ice. As the ice melts, large chunks can fall and cause injury to anyone below. When ice melts during the day and then re-freezes at night, ice dams, which block water from flowing in the gutter, may form. This condition can force water back under the roof line and cause leaks.

Sleet or freezing rain: Combinations of snow and freezing rain may cause slippery conditions and coat roads, sidewalks, and driveways with ice when temperatures drop.

Protect Yourself

The Federal Emergency Management Agency recommends that home owners have shovels on hand, as well as melting agents, such as rock salt. Some of the new, more environmentally friendly deicers include calcium magnesium acetate and sand to improve traction. Be sure to stock up early in the season, as these agents tend to be in short supply during periods before a well-publicized storm.

FEMA also advises you have enough fuel to maintain heat in your home, as well as a backup heating source: firewood if the home has a working fireplace, or a generator to power heaters in case of power failure. However, use caution as these can represent fire hazards when not used correctly. Be sure to follow directions explicitly and keep a fire extinguisher. Some generators and fireplaces also require proper ventilation, according to the Institute for Business and Home Safety, so follow directions carefully and keep them away from curtains or other flammable items.

Stock up on extra blankets, warm clothing, and enough food and water to sustain your family in case of a few days of isolation. And a transistor radio with fresh batteries can help keep you updated on news and information in case of a power outage.

Protect Your Home

Before winter, there are some precautions you can take to protect your home from the ravages of cold weather storms:

Winterize your home. Check shutters, siding, and other exterior materials to ensure they’re secure, says retired contractor and home improvement expert and writer John Wilder of Jacksonville, Fla. High winds, ice, and moisture from winter storms can easily strip off such outside elements if they’re loose.

Be sure that gutters are clear of debris and that walkways are even and don’t represent tripping hazards that can be exacerbated with snow or ice. Caulk drafty windows and apply weather stripping to doors—both inexpensive strategies that can keep heat in your home. Air sealing can help you save about $350 in energy costs or one-third of your average annual heating and cooling costs. The average annual home energy bill is about $2,200, according to Energy Star, of which about $1,000 represents heating and cooling. An assortment of air sealing materials and tools, including silicone foam, caulk, aluminum flashing for flues, and additional insulation, will run roughly $100-$350.

Winterize pipes. Be sure your pipes, especially those exposed or in unheated areas like crawl spaces, are wrapped in insulation to prevent freezing and bursting. Also, learn where your water shut-off valves are so you can turn off the water supply in case of a leak. Six feet of insulation can cost anywhere from $7-$17; it’s available at most home improvement stores.

Trim tree branches. Branches that overhang roofs or areas where you park your car — or which are simply overgrown — represent a risk to structures, vehicles, and people. Keep trees trimmed and remove those that are weak or sickly to prevent them from falling on or near your home. Tree trimming and removal pricing varies greatly, and you may have additional restrictions if you live in an historic community or if the trees are close to power lines.

Check with your municipality about any regulations and contact your local Chamber of Commerce, municipal offices, or contractor rating sites like MerchantCircle.com or AngiesList.com to get the names of reputable pros. Tree trimming and removal can be dangerous, so don’t attempt it on your own unless you’re experienced.

By keeping your home in good repair and stocking up on the supplies you’ll need before the rush for rock salt and shovels begins, you’ll be as ready as possible to tough out the storm.

Information courtesy of
houslogic
Read more: http://members.houselogic.com/articles/protect-your-home-cold-weather-threats/preview/?cid=eo_rl_sss_rcrpromo#ixzz3GbTjLN1r
Follow us: @HouseLogic on Twitter | HouseLogic on Facebook

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets

How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets

1. Prep. Remove cabinet doors and drawers and give everything a good cleaning with TSP (TriSodium Phosphate), or a TSP alternative, to remove any grease or dirt.

2. Patch. Fill in holes, dents or dings with a sandable, paintable wood filler.

3. Sand. Sand all surfaces to be painted with medium-grit sandpaper. Follow up with a good wipedown with a dry cloth to remove all dust.

4. Prime. You are now ready to apply primer. If you are going to be painting your cabinets a deep, intense shade, ask your paint retailer to add pigment to the primer to get better color coverage with the final coat.

5. Sand, prime and sand again. If you want a super-smooth finish on your cabinets, or to ensure a long-lasting, durable finish, you may want to sand and prime and then sand one last time, using fine-grit sandpaper.

6. Clean. Make sure all surfaces to be painted are completely free of dust and grit.

7. Spray or brush on the paint. If you don’t own a paint sprayer, you can rent one from

Be aware that spraying can be a messy business, and you’ll need to mask and cover anything in the room and adjacent areas that you don’t want covered with paint. Install plastic sheeting to close off other rooms in the house. Or simply paint using the highest-quality paintbrush you can afford. Use an angled brush for areas of detail, such as any raised or recessed panels on your fronts.

Note: You will want to apply at least two coats of paint. Semigloss is the best finish to use for cabinets because of its durability and ease of cleaning.

8. Install. Make sure the paint has dried and cured fully before attaching the fronts; otherwise they might stick to the boxes and cause the paint to chip off. (Installing plastic bumpers to the inside of your fronts can help prevent this). Check with your retailer or consult the paint can for estimates on drying and curing times.

Now for the fun part. Install the finished cabinet fronts and door hardware and admire your work.

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

6 Secret Reasons Fall Buyers Hate Homes

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Erin Renzas
October 14th, 2014

http://www.trulia.com/pro/author/erenzas/

1. A Hyper-Hovering Homeowner

Buyers stalk properties online and off, checking obsessively for price reductions and the like. But buyer-side home stalking is unobtrusive to sellers. On the other hand, buyers can feel stifled in their ability to fully explore or verbally process their impressions of a ƒhome when the seller hangs out inside the home while it’s being shown.

What Sellers Need to Know:
Prospective buyers may not feel comfortable talking openly with their co-buyers or agents with the homeowner there, and may not open doors and drawers in front of the seller—potentially missing some of the home’s best features. Sure, a homeowner knows what makes the home shine and can answer questions, but so can a great agent. Trust him or her to communicate what makes the home special.

2. Weird Wacky Wallpaper

Sometimes it’s the little things that sellers think won’t matter that can block an offer. Of course, when inventory is low, sellers may have a better chance of snagging an offer despite design snafus, but when the home buying season slows, it’s in a seller’s best interest to heed the advice of their agent and get their home in tip-top shape. And nothing—nothing!—is a more hated design choice than weird, wacky wallpaper.

What Sellers Need to Know:
Universal truth: Homebuyers hate wallpaper. And if that wallpaper is outdated, brightly colored, or themed, it can be hard for an otherwise serious buyer to look past it. Replace wallpaper with a neutral paint to create a fresh, new canvas that buyers will be eager to make their own.

3. Out-of-Season Listing Photos

Featuring unseasonal photos can make a listing seem outdated and turn a hot buyer prospect cold.

What Sellers Need to Know:
A listing should always feel fresh and new. Photos that feel like they were taken months ago may make buyers think that the home has been lingering on the market—making them question whether the seller may be desperate and prompting a lowball offer. Yikes!

4. Crummy Curb Appeal

More than one buyer has pulled up to a house whose listing they liked, taken one look at the exterior, and driven away. It doesn’t matter how gorgeous a home is on the inside; if buyers aren’t willing to step in the door, then you’ve lost them. And it’s just as important to have an amazing exterior when it comes to the cooler months as it is during the sizzling summer. When it comes to leaves and snow, keep walkways clean and get a snazzy place to stash umbrellas and muddy shoes.

What Sellers Need to Know:
A few simple fixes can take the curb appeal from lackluster to irresistible. Weed and mulch the flowerbeds, trim the hedges, clear the walkways, and repaint any flaking siding. Consider adding some “homey” touches like a wreath on the door or a bench on the porch. There’s no need to spend a ton on landscaping; just making the outside look presentable and welcoming can make all the difference.

5. An Insane Asking Price

Buyers already have lots to do before making the largest purchase of their lives. With all of this already on their plates, the prospect of trying to negotiate down a crazily high asking price is just too much work and too outside their comfort zones for most buyers to deal with. The average buyer won’t even bother looking at a property if the asking price is clearly high and off-base compared with other similar, nearby homes for sale.

What Sellers Need to Know:
The only opinion when it comes to price is the market’s opinion. A home should be priced so buyers feel like they’ll get a good value, not so they’ll sit on the sidelines waiting for a price reduction. You never want a buyer to think, “Great place, but way overpriced. They must not be serious about selling, so let’s move on.”

6. Perceived Massive Maintenance

Fall and winter house hunters have the unique, um, advantage of being able to see the roof, drainage systems, slopes and basements of a property performing under the precise weather conditions—rain, snow, wind and sleet—that often cause unpleasant surprises to spring and summer home buyers. Homes that display signs of big, troublesome maintenance to come (think: gutters overflowing with debris, walkways littered with slippery leaves, or a driveway covered in snow) may signal warning signs to potential buyers who won’t want to purchase a home that will end up in loads of weekend chores.

What Sellers Need to Know:
Fall is the perfect time to show off the cozy, homey feel of the property. But it’s also the time when the realities of homeownership are the most apparent. This is the time to keep up with your seasonal maintenance! Sellers should also be aware of keeping the home comfortable for the weather. When the weather cools, homes should be warm, but not stuffy. It may make a big difference!

INFORMATION COURTESY OF
trulia

http://www.trulia.com/pro/buyers/5-surprising-fall-buyer-turnoffs/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

625 35th Ave SE, Albany, OR 4 Bedroom Home For Sale

This rare find 4 bedroom beauty is located in lovely South Albany! Offering a master suite w walk in closet, master bath w tile floors & French doors leading outside to the tropical rock garden w Koi Pond! Guest bedroom w half bath. Large living room offers an office area & sitting room. Bright kitchen w oak cabinets, ample counter space & storage. Many updates including all vinyl windows & UGS. 24×12 Shed w power & concrete floors… You Must Visit This HOME!!

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ARRANGE YOUR PERSONAL TOUR VISIT

http://www.teampendley.com/625-35th-Ave-SE-Albany-OR~l4832416

OR CONTACT

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Qualifying for the $200-$500 federal tax credit on new windows and doors

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Understanding Energy Ratings for Windows and Doors
Published: January 04, 2013
By: Karin Beuerlein

Qualifying for the $200-$500 federal tax credit on new windows and doors depends on two measurements, U-factor and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient.

Just because windows or doors are Energy Star-labeled doesn’t mean they’re eligible for a federal tax credit. And with costs running about $500-$1,000 per window including labor, it’s wise to know something about the scientific lingo and numbers on the product labels you’re likely to encounter. Here’s your pro-level label-decoding guide so you can be sure you’re buying qualified products.

Which Labels Matter?

The two labels you should look for: The U.S. Department of Energy’s blue-and-yellow Energy Star label, which specifies the climate zones the product is certified for, and the white National Fenestration Rating Council label. Nonprofit NFRC is the industry-recognized certifying body for windows and doors. It reports raw numbers only; Energy Star tells you whether those numbers constitute superior performance, putting its seal of approval on those products that meet its standards.

To confuse matters, DOE has issued a blue label that manufacturers can use to signify that a product qualifies for the tax credit. But DOE doesn’t require that manufacturers include it.

What You Need to Get the Tax Credit

For windows or doors to qualify for the credit, two NFRC-supplied measurements must each be equal to or less than 0.3, regardless of climate: U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC). You must also have the manufacturer’s signed statement that the product complies with IRS requirements. This either comes with purchase or can be downloaded from the manufacturer’s website.

Don’t be swayed by ratings the manufacturer may post on its own label. A window or door’s frame and other components (weather stripping, sidelights, transoms) can significantly affect its energy efficiency, so NFRC measures based on the entire unit, not just the window glass or door slab alone. Manufacturers, on the other hand, sometimes report values that don’t take the entire unit into account, according to Energy Star.

A Guide to Measurements

The NFRC label typically lists five measurements, including the tax credit-critical U-factor and SHGC. The other three are somewhat less important to energy performance, according to Energy Star, but can help you judge how well a window or door will perform in a particular application—for example, whether it’ll let in enough light.

Where you live affects which measurements are most important, but the tax credit requirements are uniform across the country. There are four Energy Star climate zones, differentiated by whether heating, cooling, or a mix of the two is most critical to energy performance.

1. U-Factor

Range: 0.20 to 1.20

The lower the number, the better an insulator the window or door is.

Tax credit qualification requirement: 0.3 or less

Efficient Windows Collaborative climate recommendations:
Northern: 0.35 or less
North Central or South Central: 0.4 or less
Southern: 0.60 or less

A low U-factor means that less heat escapes in the winter, which makes it particularly important in cold northern climates, according to the Collaborative, a coalition of government agencies, research organizations, and manufacturers that promote efficient window technology.

2. Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC)

Range: 0 to 1

The lower the number, the less solar radiation—and heat—the window or door allows inside.

Tax credit qualification requirement: 0.3 or less

EWC climate recommendations:
Northern: The highest you can find (paired with a low U-factor) if cooling isn’t a significant concern; up to 0.55 if cooling is a significant concern.
North Central: 0.4 or less for climates with significant air conditioning; up to 0.55 for climates with moderate air conditioning.
South Central or Southern: 0.4 or less.

SHGC refers to the solar radiation a window or door allows inside. Seek the lowest possible SHGC rating in warm climates to minimize the use of air conditioning. Look for a slightly higher number in cooler climates so that the sun can help heat your home in winter, but be sure to balance SHGC with an efficient U-factor for your area.

3. Visible Transmittance

Range: 0 to 1

Lower number means the room will be dimmer; a higher number means the room will be brighter.

Tax credit qualification requirement: none

This number applies to windows or doors with windows only. Visible transmittance is the amount of light a window allows to pass through. With older window glazing techniques, VT and solar heat gain were basically the same; the brighter a room, the hotter it got. But new technologies allow windows to let in lots of light while the room stays cool.

Consult VT numbers if you’re looking to reduce glare in a room or fill it with natural light, but be warned that a very low VT may mean you have to use artificial lighting even during the day.

4. Air Leakage

Range: N/A, but .0.3 is standard building code

The lower the number, the more airtight the window or door.

Tax credit qualification requirement: none

This number, expressed in cubic feet per minute per square foot of window/door area, represents the amount of air that the window or door’s frame allows to pass through. Energy Star standards don’t consider air leakage because it’s difficult to measure accurately and can change over time as frame materials expand, contract, or warp in place, according to the EWC. Still, this measurement can help you compare similar products, especially if they’ll be buffeted by the elements.

5. Condensation Resistance

Range: 1 to 100

The lower the number, the more condensation the window or door allows to build up.

Tax credit qualification requirement: none

Condensation resistance is a measure of how much moisture a window or door allows to build up on the surface (which can drip onto wood and cause mold or discoloration) or between glazing layers (which can’t be clean and blocks your view). Energy Star-rated windows tend to resist condensation well, so this number won’t likely affect your purchase decision.

Before Buying New Windows

You can recoup 78.7% of the project cost for midrange vinyl replacement windows, according to Remodeling Magazine’s annual Cost vs. Value Report.

But before you buy, check out these articles for more info:

INFORMATION COURTESY OF
houselogic
Read more: http://www.houselogic.com/home-advice/windows-doors/understanding-energy-ratings-for-windows-and-doors/#ixzz3FqGzXL44
Follow us: @HouseLogic on Twitter | HouseLogic on Facebook

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

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