How to Keep Your House Cool Without AC

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Want summer comfort but hate the AC? Follow these tips, and you’ll keep your house cool without frosty air conditioning

You don’t have to switch on the air conditioner to get a big chill this summer. These tips will help you keep your house cool without AC, which will save energy (and avoid AC wars with your family).

Block that Sun!

When sunlight enters your house, it turns into heat. You’ll keep your house cooler if you reduce solar heat gain by keeping sunlight out.
Close the drapes: Line them with light-colored fabric that reflects the sun, and close them during the hottest part of the day. Let them pillow onto the floor to block air movement.

Add awnings: Install them on south- and west-facing windows to reduce solar heat gain by up to 77%, says the U.S. Department of Energy. Make your own by tacking up sheets outside your windows and draping the ends over a railing or lawn chair.
Install shutters: Interior and exterior shutters not only reduce heat gain and loss, but they also add security and protect against bad weather. Interior shutters with adjustable slats let you control how much sun you let in.
Apply high-reflectivity window film: Install energy-saving window films on east- and west-facing windows, which will keep you cool in summer, but let in warming sun in the winter. Mirror-like films are more effective than colored transparent films.

Here’s more information about energy-efficient window coverings.

Open Those Windows

Be sure to open windows when the outside temperature is lower than the inside. Cool air helps lower the temps of everything — walls, floors, furniture — that will absorb heat as temps rise, helping inside air say cooler longer.

To create cross-ventilation, open windows on opposite sides of the house. Good ventilation helps reduce VOCs and prevents mold.

Fire Up Fans

Portable fans: At night, place fans in open windows to move cool air. In the day, put fans where you feel their cooling breezes (moving air evaporates perspiration and lowers your body temperature). To get extra cool, place glasses or bowls of ice water in front of fans, which will chill the moving air.
Ceiling fans: For maximum cooling effect, make sure ceiling fans spin in the direction that pushes air down, rather than sucks it up. Be sure to turn off fans when you’re not in the room, because fan motors give off heat, too
Whole house fans: A whole-house fan ($1,000 to $1,600, including install) exhausts hot inside air out through roof vents. Make sure your windows are open when you run a whole-house fan.

Power Down Appliances

You’ll save money and reduce heat output by turning off appliances you’re not using, particularly your computer and television. Powering down multiple appliances is easier if you connect them to the same power strip.

Don’t use heat- and steam-generating appliances — ranges, ovens, washers, dryers — during the hottest part of the day. In fact, take advantage of the heat by drying clothes outside on a line.

Plant Trees and Vines

These green house-coolers shade your home’s exterior and keep sunlight out of windows. Plant them by west-facing walls, where the sun is strongest.

Deciduous trees, which leaf out in spring and drop leaves in fall, are best because they provide shade in summer, then let in sun when temperatures drop in autumn. Select trees that are native to your area, which have a better chance of surviving. When planting, determine the height, canopy width, and root spread of the mature tree and plant accordingly.

Climbing vines, such as ivy and Virginia creeper, also are good outside insulators. To prevent vine rootlets or tendrils from compromising your siding, grow them on trellises or wires about 6 inches away from the house.

Speaking of shade, here are smart, inexpensive ideas for shading your patio.

Want more tips for staying cool this summer? Substitute CFL and LED bulbs for hotter incandescent lights.

Information courtesy of
houselogic

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Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Get to Know Oregon; Oregon Dunes

Reedsport is on the Central Oregon Coast, approximately 2 miles inland from the Pacific Ocean. The communities of Winchester Bay and Gardiner are located 4 miles to the south and 2 miles to the north. The combined area of the three communities is referred to as the Lower Umpqua Area.

The Lower Umpqua Area is approximately 60 miles from the I-5 corridor, 87 miles southwest of Eugene, 70 miles northwest of Roseburg (County Seat) and 200 miles south of Portland.

The Coastal Communities are the gateway to 40 miles of undisturbed beaches and the tallest dunes in Oregon and the only Lighthouse on the west coast featuring a red lens, spectacular sunsets, a world-class Skate Board Park, magnificent Roosevelt Elk herds, the best fishing on the Oregon Coast, and other abundant wildlife and aviary viewing opportunities.

The rich and diverse natural beauty affords a number of outdoor recreational opportunities including body surfing at the beach, scuba diving, hiking through miles of tall timber, skateboarding, biking, ATVing, boating, fishing, walking the beach, sun bathing at Loon Lake, kayaking on the Umpqua River, splashing in the clear waters of Lake Marie, Whale Watching at the Umpqua River Lighthouse, roasting hot dogs over a beach bonfire, or sitting on one of the beach dunes watching the sun set into the ocean with someone you love.

Wind-sculpted sand dunes towering to 500 feet above sea level provide numerous recreational opportunities including off-highway vehicle use, hiking, photography, fishing, canoeing, horseback riding and camping. Visitors enjoy thick “tree islands”, open dunes, marsh-like deflation plains and beaches. The Carter Dunes Trail and Oregon Dunes Day Use provide disabled access for forest visitors.

From Florence to Coos Bay, the Oregon Dunes NRA extends for 40 miles along the Oregon Coast. Formed by the ancient forces of wind, water and time, these dunes are like no others in the world. These are the largest expanse of coastal sand dunes in North America and they hold numerous opportunities for adventure and solitude. Find out more about the geology of the Dunes.

Thousands of off-highway vehicle riders come to enjoy the thrill of riding across these expansive tracks of sand. Three main off-highway vehicle riding areas have been set aside to provide riders with a variety of experiences. There are sand roads and designated rides between South Jetty to the Siltcoos River, small areas with the highest and most dramatic dunes in Umpqua Riding area, and large areas with varied riding opportunities between Spinreel and Horsfall. Whether by sand rail, motorcycle, 4×4, quad or guided trip riders are in for a treat.

If water sports are more to your liking the Oregon Dunes offers a myriad of opportunities. With over 30 lakes and ponds, and numerous streams to choose from, you can enjoy sailing, canoeing, water-skiing, swimming, scuba diving and fishing. Large lakes include Woahink, Siltcoos, Tahkenitch, Eel, and North and South Tenmile Lakes.

Or get away from it all on one of our variety of hiking opportunities and immerse yourself in the quiet solitude of the costal forests extending nearly to the ocean. Many trails rove through forest flourishing in Douglas-fir and Sitka spruce. Some trails wind up, over and through sand dunes offering hikers the chance to experience the natural wonder that makes this area unique. One moment you may be trekking over vast expanses of sand, only to give way to low lying wetlands or a hidden lake at the bottom of a dune. At the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area, adventures and wonder are truly around every corner.

For more information visit

http://www.go-oregon.com/Oregon-Dunes-National-Recreation-Area/

Team Pendley
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We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

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(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

39586 Baptist Church Rd, Lebanon, OR 9.65 Acres

Looking for acreage close to town? This home has it all. Open kitchen and spacious living room offer a welcoming feel. This 4 bedroom/3 bath home sits on 9.65 acres, lots of privacy include a tree house & nice fire pit where you can sit and watch deer and wild turkey roam. If gardening is your fancy, there is a green house as well with apple, cherry, pear & walnut trees Detached 1 car garage with shop area & 2 extra outbuilding. The 2278 sq. ft does not include 802 sq ft. of unfinished basement.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ARRANGE YOUR PERSONAL TOUR VISIT

http://www.teampendley.com/39586-Baptist-Church-Rd-Lebanon-OR~l4654387

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We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

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Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Get to Know Oregon Luckiamute River

Author: Grant McOmie

The Little Luckiamute River cuts a bee-line through eastern flanks of the Oregon Coast Range before it falls in an ear-shattering moment at Falls City, while less than three miles away another sort of “fall” happens when mountain bikers gather and catch big air across a little piece of heaven called Black Rock Mountain.

It’s called “Free Riding” and it’s on a little piece of cycling heaven where the riders catch big air across 500 acres of Oregon State Forest at Black Rock Mountain in Polk County.

The volunteer organization that makes it all work is called the Black Rock Mountain Bike Association or “BRMBA” for short. Rich Bontrager, the association president, told me that the group is now seven years old and fifteen hundred members strong.

He noted that it all started with a simple dream. “I think we all need to help get people off the couch and out in the forest … to see that there’s other stuff out here than the city pavement or a computer game – it’s that sort of thing that draws folks – something new and different and exciting.”

BRMBA member, Todd Glascow, a longtime rider, said that “feature” ideas are really born of the experiences that riders have as they take on trails across the United States. “Oh yes – we ride other areas, see other things and incorporate them into our own ideas and then take a spin on it. While some material is bought and some donated, a good majority of the wood that we use is fallen timber found in the forest.”

Whether catching big air and enjoying the freedom that comes from speeding down a forest trail on two wheels, the riders agree that there’s something for every level of experience at Black Rock Mountain. “You’re out here in the trees and you’re away from everything else,” noted Glascow. “You’re far away from the daily grind. You can have a stressful day or stressful week and you come out here and ride a bike – it’s all gone!”

Polk County offers more stress-free zones as the Luckiamute River flows into the Willamette Valley. In fact, when you pull in to Oregon’s very first state park called Sarah Helmick, located off Oregon State Highway 99 – you will discover a hidden gem.

“Oh yes – it really is a hidden gem,” said Oregon State Park Manager Bryan Nielsen. “It’s off the beaten path for sure, but the folks who’ve been coming here for decades like it that way.”

It’s a gem of a parkland that dates to 1922 when the Helmick family donated the land for future generations. “Back in the 1950s, camping really took off,” said Nielsen. “Motor homes were invented, trailers were improving as technology was changing. The economy was improving and people had more free time. Parks like Sarah Helmick really took off were valued for their peace and quiet.”

The park sprawls across 40 acres with plentiful picnic sites and play-spaces under the shady limbs of giant oak and maple trees. “It’s great place to get out and stretch the legs,” added Nielsen. “Just to enjoy a beautiful park and get away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life.”

Less than twenty minutes east, the Luckiamute River slows and seems to meander on its way to meet the Willamette River as it course through a state park where they’re trying something new. Luckiamute Landing State Natural Area is parkland without rental cabins, trailer hook-ups or play areas for the kids. It is a new park where they’re turning the clock back to help restore wildlife habitat.

Park Ranger Steve DeGoey explained that the goal is to enhance nearly 1000 acres for wildlife including varied bird life and even endangered western pond turtles. It’s a day-use parkland that invites hikers or river paddlers and it is waiting for you to explore anytime.

“We’ve planted about 440,000 shrubs and trees since 2011, so be sure to bring your binoculars when you come to visit. We’ve several miles of hiking trails too! We have a variety of birds and in spring the wildflowers bloom too. Plus, two ponds that are home to western pond turtles that like to warm themselves on the logs. They can be a shy animal so be quiet and walk softly or they quickly jump into the water.”

for more information visit

http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/luckiamute-river/

Team Pendley
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We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

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Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

$15,000 Price Reduction Great 4 Plex Opportunity!!!!

Del_Rio_1

Great investment opportunity or owner occupy 4-plex. Townhouse style units with Two 3 bd/1.5 bath and Two – 2 BR/ 1.5 Bath units. All units currently rented. Tenants pay all utilities. Each unit has a covered,private patio and storage area as well with an attached 1 car garage. Nicely maintained, Good rental history and Cash flow. $2575 Per Month Income

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ARRANGE YOUR PERSONAL TOUR VISIT

http://www.teampendley.com/1666-Del-Rio-Av-SE-Albany-OR~l4638548

OR CONTACT

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Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Central Air Conditioner Maintenance

TeamPendley:

Great information

Originally posted on Home Remodeler Blog:

It’s been a cool summer so far in many parts of the Midwest but those of us who live here know that the heat will be coming soon! Now is the time to do a little maintenance to make sure that your central air conditioner will be running at peak efficiency when you really need it. In this video from the Carrier Consumer Education Series, Larry Hacker and Stuart Keith take an in-depth look at Central Air Conditioner Maintenance.

For more videos on home building, remodeling and maintenance, visit our website.

Central Air Maintenance

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Get to Know Oregon Iron Mountain Hike

Grant McOmie – July 3rd, 2014 –

On a dreamy summer morning, the South Santiam River flows fast and clear and provides a fine place to start a day that promises a simmering afternoon.

US Forest Service Ranger Jennifer O’Leary said that Yukwah Campground puts you in touch with Cascade Mountain adventures. “There are so many recreation opportunities available along the river corridor; developed campgrounds and dispersed camping, river recreation and lots of hiking trails.”

The camping and especially the hiking are all right with me, 30 miles east of Sweet Home along State Highway 20, where the spacious, barrier free Walton Ranch Trail provides wheelchair accessibility and leads you up a gentle grade through a lichen-draped forest.

The payoff of your hiking effort is a sprawling viewing platform that’s more than a hundred feet long and gives you a peek at views of the South Santiam River and a huge meadow beyond where Roosevelt elk are often seen too.

The short hike is a fine warm-up for a dandy just up the road, too. If time is on your side for a day-long excursion, discover the spectacular bursts and hues of an amazing array of red, blue, and yellow alpine wildflowers that steal the scene at the little-known geologic wonder named Iron Mountain.

This destination will challenge you with its 1.7-mile hike and 1,500 feet of elevation gain. Cesar Barajas is an avid hiker who said that when he tackles Iron Mountain, he carries food, plenty of water and – of course, his camera. “The hike is not easy,” noted Barajas. “You are definitely going to drop some sweat along the way, but the spectacular views and all the wildflowers make the trip so exciting.”

The Iron Mountain Trail leads through stands of trees and up the side of the mountain at a moderate grade. It branches about halfway up – stay to the right and you’ll soon be zigging and zagging along a series of switchbacks up an even steeper grade. There’s quite an impressive show as you ramble through meadow after meadow exploding with wild color.

Pause often, catch your breath and savor the likes of sapphire lupine or crimson paintbrush – plus larkspur, penstemon and columbine; there are so many wildflower varieties that are always at your side. Practically every wildflower that grows in the Western Cascade Mountains – more than 300 species – can be found along this trail.

Jennifer O’Leary added that the wildflower show peaks in July, but many varieties continue blooming through September. “You can experience not only the wildflowers that grow here into the fall, but you can look out across the Cascades – in fact, the top of Iron Mountain was actually the site of a former lookout.”

The fire lookout days are gone and now there is a spacious wooden platform with benches that provide a fine resting place. You can sit and drink in the gorgeous views of a dozen snowy Cascade Mountain peaks.

You can also discover the unique geology of the place: 6 million years ago, successive eruptions from Iron Mountain reached across the landscape. Through the eons, oxidation has cast many of the ancient and exposed cliffs, outcroppings and spires in varied hues of burnished red. “Everywhere I look up here,” noted Barajas, “There’s something to view: you have all of these mountains and then this carpet of color. It’s all so awesome.”

While the hike is steep, narrow in places and has many switchbacks, the summer alpine wildflowers steal the scene. Early mornings and late evenings are best.

Oregon’s Iron Giant will capture your heart and offer you an invitation to return. And you will!

Directions: From Portland travel south on Interstate 5 to Albany and the junction with U.S. 20. Take U.S. 20 east through Sweet Home. At 19 miles beyond Sweet Home you will reach Yukwah Campground, one mile further is the Walton Ranch Interpretive Trail that is wheelchair-accessible. To reach Iron Mountain Trailheads: travel Hwy 20 east for 34 miles to FS Road 15 and turn right. The parking area is 0.5 mile down the road to your right. A second trailhead can be accessed by traveling approximately 32 miles from Sweet Home and then turn left on 035. Travel 2.6 miles on 035 to the trailhead. A restroom is available at this trailhead. Not at the other. An interpretive brochure is available at the trailhead. A NW Forest Service Pass is required.

For more information visit

http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/iron-mountain-hike/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

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