Open House Sunday Sept 28th 1:00pm-3:00pm 3750 Spicer Drive, Albany, OR

Spicer_24

This “One owner” Classic 60’s Ranch Style home offers over 2500 sq ft, 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 car garage PLUS 40 x 60 Shop with loft area for storage!! You will NOT believe the room sizes in this home! Large Living room with fire place and dining room. Family room off the kitchen with breakfast bar, enclosed with 2 sliders to the HUGE back yard! Storm windows throughout. Inside laundry room is 13×18 in size with room for any hobby or storage needs! You must visit this lovely home!

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ARRANGE YOUR PERSONAL TOUR VISIT

http://www.teampendley.com/3750-Spicer-Drive-Albany-OR~l4664955

OR CONTACT
Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Get to Know Oregon The Pittock Mansion Portland Oregon

The Pittock Mansion was home to Portland pioneers Henry and Georgiana Pittock from 1914 to 1919. During the late 1800s and the early 1900s, their lives and work paralleled the growth of Portland from a small Northwest town site to a thriving city with a quarter million population. With its eclectic architectural design and richly decorated interior, including family artifacts, the Pittock Mansion stands today as a living memorial of this family’s contributions to the blossoming of Portland and its people.

English-born Henry Lewis Pittock journeyed on a wagon train from Pennsylvania to Oregon in 1853 where, at the young age of 19, and in his own words, “barefoot and penniless,” he began working for Thomas Jefferson Dryer’s Weekly Oregonian newspaper. In 1860, at the age of 26, he married 15-year-old Georgiana Martin Burton of Missouri. Six years prior, Georgiana had crossed the plains from Keokuk, Iowa to Oregon Territory with her parents. Georgiana’s father E.M. Burton was a flour mill owner and one of early Portland’s well known building contractors

Together, Henry and Georgiana began a long life of work, community service, and devotion to family, which would last 58 years and celebrate six children and eighteen grandchildren.

A consummate businessman, Henry Pittock took ownership of the Weekly Oregonian in 1860, changing its format to the daily paper we read today. He went on to build an empire incorporating real estate, banking, railroads, steamboats, sheep ranching, silver mining, and the pulp and paper industry.

Georgiana dedicated herself to improving the lives of the community’s women and children. She helped found the Ladies Relief Society in 1867, whose Children’s Home provided care, food, and shelter for needy children. Georgiana also worked with the Woman’s Union, and played a key role in building the Martha Washington Home for single, working women.

The couple was known for their quiet reserve, helpful demeanor, and love for the outdoors. Georgiana cherished gardening, and kept a terraced flower garden at the mansion covered with every kind of flower imaginable. She frequently adorned her house with cut flowers, and is recognized for originating the tradition of Portland’s annual Rose Festival.

A vigorous outdoorsman, Henry rode horses in the Rose Festival parades, and was a member of the first party to climb Mt. Hood, one of the spectacular peaks visible from the mansion. On one of his climbing expeditions, someone suggested that the group sit down and rest, at which point Henry responded, “The man who sits down never reaches the top.”

Henry and Georgiana were at the pinnacle of their successful lives when they commissioned architect Edward Foulkes to design and build their new home overlooking Portland, the city they loved.

They began planning and designing their new home in 1909. The mansion was completed in 1914, replete with stunningly progressive features including a central vacuum system, intercoms, and indirect lighting. The house also creatively incorporated Turkish, English, and French designs. In keeping with their loyalty to their home state, the Pittocks hired Oregon craftsmen and artisans, and used Northwest materials to build the house. The final estate included the mansion, a three-car garage, a greenhouse, and the Italianate gate lodge servants’ residence, all situated on 46 acres of land almost 1,000 feet above downtown Portland.

At 80 and 68 respectively, Henry and Georgiana moved to their new home. The hard-working couple who had lived in the heart of Portland as it developed from a forest clearing to a bustling business center, now resided high in the hills, with a breathtaking vista of their beloved Portland. It was a warm and gracious house for both the adults and children of the family.

Georgiana died in 1918 at the age of 72, and Henry in 1919 at 84. The Pittock family remained in residence at the mansion until 1958, when Peter Gantenbein, a Pittock grandson who had been born in the house, put the estate on the market.

The threat of demolition at the hands of land developers, and the extensive damage caused by a storm in 1962, brought concerned citizens together to raise funds to preserve the site. Seeing this popular support, and agreeing that the house had tremendous value as a unique historic resource, the City of Portland purchased the estate in 1964 for $225,000. Fifteen months were spent restoring it. The mansion opened to the public in 1965, and has been a community landmark ever since.

A house of historical significance and visual magnificence, the Pittock Mansion today offers us a uniquely personal opportunity to peek into the past, and study our world as it was – from the viewpoint of one Portland family.
FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT

http://pittockmansion.org/visit-the-mansion/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Get to Know Oregon Sumpter Valley Railroad

Author: Grant McOmie

The beauty of traveling Oregon’s back roads and byways is the unexpected treasure that you may find along the way – not just the scenery, but interesting lessons about Oregon’s past. When the whistle blows near Sumpter, Oregon one thing’s for sure: adventure isn’t far behind!

“Last call! Train Number One to Sumpter departing in five minutes!” said Sumpter Railroad conductor Daniel Bentz. The young man strolled across the wooden planks of the McEwen Depot and played his part well in a period costume and a full on character performance.

He continued: “So hurry and buy a ticket – then step aboard the Stump Dodger, because even a century later, this railroad is always on time.”

Up to four times a day, Baker County’s Sumpter Valley Railroad makes the twelve mile round trip run from McEwen Depot to Sumpter. It’s a railroad that reaches back to the early days of settlement in northeastern Oregon, according to the railroad’s operations manager, Taylor Rush. “The railway meandered in and out of every canyon throughout the Sumpter Valley as it followed the timber line in the 1880’s. In those days they said the railroad engine would dodge the stumps as it crawled up into the mountains and that name just stuck.”

Conductor Bentz added, “The original purpose of the railroad was to haul logs down to mills in Baker City where they were cut and hauled out across the nation. But the railroad also hauled regular goods, passengers and during cattle season there would be long stock trains heading down to the valley.”

These days, tourists have replaced the cattle and timber. Folks travel here from all over the country to escape city hubbub and settle in for a slower pace and also learn more about Baker County‘s past — especially the county’s gold mining past, when giant gold mining dredges turned the Powder River and greater Sumpter area upside down for miles around. Decades later, the tailing’s piles undulate like snakes across the valley floor.

Bentz noted, “They (dredges) chewed up the rock, sifted out the gold and then shot the rock out the back end of the floating dredge. It was amazing but it also damaged the valley’s environment. Remember, this was long before major environmental laws were passed and no one was really concerned about it.”

When you reach the town of Sumpter, stroll a couple of blocks and go aboard a unique Oregon State Park. The Sumpter Dredge offers you a chance to learn more about the area’s golden past.

Square-bowed and built of steel and wood and iron, three giant dredges lifted and sifted the terrain, reaping a golden harvest worth $12 million during the peak of the depression era. Today, it is a park that holds on to history and takes visitors aboard to see and touch the past at the Sumpter Valley Dredge State Heritage Area.

“Each bucket (there are 72 total) on this dredge would pick up about 9 cubic feet of material. It would wash the gold off the rocks and would drop thru into some sluice boxes and then out the back,” said park ranger Garret Nelson.

Inside the heart of the dredge – big as a barn and filled with gears and belts, winches and pumps –the rock passed through steel cylinders, separating rocks by size before water and sluices separated the gold from the dirt — nine tons of gold in twenty years!

Rella Pfleeger-Brown is the assistant park ranger and guides visitors aboard the dredge. She pointed out how the buckets moved like the chain links of a chainsaw, bored into the riverbank and carried loose rock back into the dredge’s hulking interior. Water and sluices separated the gold from the sediment and the spoils from this process were discharged behind the behemoth as it moved across the valley.

Miners removed nine tons of gold in nineteen years! If you are lucky, you may meet some of the men who lived the history; like brothers Wes and Paul Dickison – they grew up in nearby Baker City. In 1947, the two teens worked on the dredge for highest wages around: $1.35 an hour. “OSHA would have shut this thing down the very first day they stepped on it,” noted Paul. “There were all kinds of hazards; cables, open gears that weren’t guarded. And if the power went out – watch out!”

Wes recalled that happened twice. When the electric power that ran the dredge failed and everything stopped on the night shift. “We didn’t have lights,” said Paul. “We had nothing for light and it was the spookiest place you’d ever been in your life. All these pumps running, pipes running, water running, mud everywhere and boom – power went off and it was coal black. You’d hear a splash over here, splash over there – something there – real spooky!”

But the lure of golden profit was strong and repairs were made quickly so operations could continue. It’s the noise the brothers remembered the most. The dredge operations were so loud you couldn’t talk, so a bell system was the only way to communicate. Signals were written on the wall – long and short rings – that helped the three-men crew communicate across the massive floating machine.

Jerry Howard’s father was a winch-man in the 1930s who operated the dredge from three stories up in the winch room. He had a commanding view of the entire operation. Inside the room, handles moved cables that moved the buckets down below that gouged out the ground. “I can still hear the rocks hitting the tailings,” noted Howard. He recalled bringing lunch to his father and said it was a real boyhood adventure to go aboard the dredge. “The digging of the bucket line was something – 72 buckets going round and round 24 hours a day. It dug up a lot of land.”

They are lasting reminders of a bygone era for sure, yet time has a way of healing the land: trees and other vegetation are slowly coming back along the river. Ranger Garrett Nelson added that it remains an important Oregon story that he enjoys sharing with park visitors. “It’s rich with history! The dredge is a piece of that and it’s got a lot of interesting history that’s fun to dig into.”

Railroad engineer Dale Olsen added that a ride on the “Sumpter Stump Dodger” is a direct link with Oregon’s past and from where he sits, the railroad and the dredge are living museums that are worth a visit. “It’s important to keep in touch with our past. Both – in their own ways – are machines of beauty that are worth a visit and an understanding of their place in Oregon’s mining history.”

“The telling of Oregon history is an important mission for Oregon State Parks,” added Ranger Brown. “By virtue of the dredge’s presence in the valley, many visitors ask those questions and then you can teach them about that time. It really does provide the opportunity to share that chapter of Oregon’s past – and it’s really fun – it’s really fun.”

The Sumpter Valley Railroad continues operations on weekends through September. The Sumpter Dredge State Park is open through October.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT

http://traveloregon.com/trip-ideas/grants-getaways/sumpter-valley-railroad/

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY SEPT. 21, 11:00AM TO 2:00PM

Newer 2bedroom, 2 bath w/Office or Guest Room! This AMAZING home in Bayshore is located just a one block walk to the beach & very close to private clubhouse. Entry through an enclosed courtyard w/floor to ceiling windows makes any weather perfect for outdoor bbqing, & entertaining. Living room has a gas fireplace, spacious open floor plan & 360 degrees of fantastic views. Master suite has a full bath w/Jacuzzi tub, 2nd bedroom has jack-and-jill entry to bathroom w/shower & inside laundry. 3rd bedroom/office or guest room has built in book shelves & entertainment center.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT

http://www.teampendley.com/2802-NW-Convoy-Way-Waldport-OR~l2170059

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

12 Ways to Get a Luxe Bathroom Look for Less

1. Grout color. Tiling all or most of your wall surface gives it a nice polished look, but the costs can really add up. White ceramic subway tiles are the most affordable option at most big-box stores, but the finished look can sometimes seem a little flat. Make your installation stand out by using a dark or colored grout, like in the bathroom shown here. Because guess what? Gray grout costs the same as white.

2. Larger-format tiles. Another idea is to search for an out-of-the-box dimension rather than the typical 3-inch by 6-inch format. Tile sizes like 2 by 9 inches or 4 by 8 inches will make your bathroom stand out from the rest.

3. Trim accents. Or consider giving your standard tile a punch by splurging a bit on trim pieces as accents. These will give your room an interesting, graphic element, but the small quantity needed won’t break the bank.

4. Tile rug. Most bathroom designers will tell you that if you want to splurge on any one part of the renovation, it should be the floor, because it has the biggest impact. Instead of laying a pricey stone mosaic everywhere, you can save by designing a “rug” with just a few square feet of something eye catching, and using large-format field tiles in a coordinating stone around it.

5. Upgrade knobs and pulls. If you don’t have the funds to spend on a custom vanity, don’t fret. A simple model can look one-of-a-kind with some pretty hardware, like the pulls seen here. Try a vintage or specialty store to find hardware that is unique

6. Furniture vanities. You can repurpose a fabulous piece of furniture you already own or a flea market find into a unique vanity. If you are even a little handy, you can use one of the many DIY tutorials online that will show you how to cut holes in the surface for a drop-in sink and faucet, as well as retrofit drawers to make room for the water supply.

7. Choose stone wisely. Nothing beats the warmth and visual beauty of natural stone in the bathroom, but of course it’s not a cheap option. Check your local stone yard for remnants that fit your design and consider less exotic types that are more affordable. For example, Carrara marble is often 25 percent less than other varieties, such as Calacatta or Thassos.

8. Source the bathtub carefully. One of the most expensive features of a new bathroom can be the biggest fixture of all: the bathtub. Gorgeous versions from upscale manufacturers can run more than $10,000. To get a similar look, check Craigslist or local architectural salvage shops for vintage tubs under $500. For $500 to $700 more, you can have it professionally reglazed to get it looking as good as new.

9. Consider chrome. When it comes to picking a finish for all of your plumbing fittings, there are so many options — nickel, bronze, brass and more. Chrome is usually the least expensive. And on the plus side, it’s the easiest to maintain and keep clean, and it looks great in both modern and traditional spaces.

10. Don’t write off shower curtains. You can make smart choices when decorating your finished bathroom, too. Instead of commissioning expensive glass doors for your shower, go with a fresh white curtain. You can’t go wrong.

11. Find your own mirrors. Forgo the cheap “builder’s special” frameless mirrors that are often hung over vanities in favor of styles with a little more flair, like this shapely pair.

12. Don’t forget the details. While high-end apothecary soaps and lotions often have beautiful packaging, these items can really add up. Pick your favorite products from the drugstore and pour them into pretty glass pumps and bottles that look great and will last forever.

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

Oregon Corn Mazes and Pumpkin Patches

images pum

Fall is in the air and it is that time again. Time to search out the perfect pumpkin.
Here is a list of Oregon Corn Mazes and Pumpkin Patches to assist you in your search!

HAPPY HUNTING!!!

Airlie Hills Farm (503) 851-6904
10775 Airlie Rd, Monmouth, OR, 97361

Baggenstos Farm Store (503) 590-4301
15801 SW Roy Rogers Rd., Sherwood, OR, 97140

Bauman’s Farm and Garden (503) 792-3524
12989 Howell Pr. Rd., Gervais, OR, 97026

Bobnick’s Family Produce and Pumpkins (503) 826-0218
38600 Proctor Blvd., Sandy, OR,

Bose Family Farm (541) 971-0458
35765 Cyrus Road NE, Albany, OR, 97322

Bushue’s Pumpkin Patch (503) 663-6709
9880 SE Rvenue Road, Boring, OR, 97009

EZ Orchards (503) 393-1506
5504 Hazel Green Road NE, Salem, OR, 97305-9502

Fazio Farms Inc. (503) 289-2020
8433 N.E. 13th Ave., Portland, OR, 97211

Fir Point Farms (503) 678-2455
14601 Arndt Road, Aurora, OR, 97002-8411

French Prairie Gardens (503) 633-8445
17673 French Prairie Road, Saint Paul, OR, 97071

Greengable Gardens (541) 929-4444
24689 Grange Hall Rd., Philomath, OR, 97370

Heavenly Harvest Farm (541) 753-8463
5757 NE Hwy 20, Corvallis, OR, 97330

Jim Dandy Farm (503) 324-3954
45770 NW Sunset Hwy, Banks, OR, 97106

Lake View Farms (503) 647-2336
31345 NW North Avenue, North Plains, OR, 97133-6145

Lone Pine Farms Limited (541) 688-4389
91909 River Road, Junction City, OR, 97448

Muddy Creek Maze (541) 740-3869
11199 Llewlynn Rd, Corvallis, OR, 97333

Olson Farms (503) 658-2237
22255 SE Borges Rd, Damascus, OR, 97089

Pearmine’s Pumpkin Patch (503) 409-8954
12223 River Rd. NE, Gervais, OR, 97026

The Great Pumpkin Patch
(866) 611-2676
1222 Miller Road SE, Jefferson, OR, 97352-9769

The Maize at the Big Red Barn (541) 892-8525
9606 Highway 39, Klamath Falls, OR, 97603-9799

The Pumpkin Patch-Sauvie Island (503) 621-7110
16525 NW Gillihan Road, Portland, OR, 97231

Uncle Daniel’s Pumpkin Patch (541) 926-9737
772 Gold Fish Farm RD, Albany, OR, 07322

Vince Woods Farm (503) 393-0120
6435 62nd Ave NE, Salem, OR, 97305

Willamette Valley Fruit Co. (503) 871-0033
2994 82nd Ave NE , Salem, OR, 97305

Wolfe’s Web (541) 667-8500
1600 E Highland Avenue, Hermiston, OR, 97838-9010

Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

1497 North Heights, Albany, OR For Sale by Team Pendley

Hard to find 5 bedroom Home in North Albany w Home Office or Dual Living Possibilities built by Sierra Construction. This lovely home offers an open living floor plan, formal dining room, family room w bonus area including gas fire place. Kitchen offers ample storage w island, breakfast nook, & large windows! Finishes include crown molding, trayed ceilings, & central a/c. Master suite offers walk in closet, dual sinks & Jacuzzi tub. Oversized 2 car garage, Large RV Parking, Exterior entrance for home office or dual living. Fenced back yard, impeccable landscaping, gazebo, & MORE!

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND TO ARRANGE YOUR PERSONAL TOUR VISIT

http://www.teampendley.com/1497-North-Heights-Albany-OR~l4670445

OR CONTACT
Team Pendley
with RE/MAX Integrity
We Go The Extra Mile, It’s Less Crowded!

http://www.teampendley.com/

Pat Pendley, Principal Broker
(541) 990-2530

Christie Pendley, Broker
Certified Distressed Property Expert
(541) 619-3640

Doug Hall, Broker
(541) 979-0571

**Pat Pendley, Christie Pendley ,and Doug Hall, are licensed Real Estate Brokers in the State of Oregon with RE/MAX Integrity

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